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Te Papa Tongarewa Museum - A Celebration of New Zealand’s Diverse Cultural Heritage

00:15:24

Te Papa Tongarewa Museum - A Celebration of New Zealand’s Diverse Cultural Heritage

Today, we visit New Zealand, one of the rare countries to receive many Shining World Awards. In 2006, the government of New Zealand was the recipient of the Shining World Leadership Award for Peace and in 2018, the Shining World Leadership Award for Compassion. In 2019, the New Zealand government also became a laureate of the Shining World Leadership Award for Earth Conservation, the Shining World Leadership Award for Earth Protection, the Shining World Leadership Award for Climate-Change Mitigation, and the Shining World Leadership Award for Earth Restoration, etc. New Zealand’s indigenous Māori title is “Aotearoa,” meaning “Land of the Long White Cloud.” The Māori name given to New Zealand’s national museum, Te Papa Tongarewa, means “our container of treasured things and people that spring from Mother Earth here in New Zealand.” Although New Zealand already had a national museum with roots that stretch back to the colonial period, it was decided that the newly constructed Te Papa Tongarewa Museum would create a lasting bond of unity between the Tangata Whenua, the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand, and Tangata Tiriti, the non-indigenous New Zealand people. The entire museum is considered a “waharoa,” or a traditional entrance way, that introduces visitors to a New Zealand rich in cultural and natural heritage. Visitors who arrive at the museum will be greeted with the view of a Rongomaraeroa Te Marae, a traditional, cultural, and spiritual meeting place of the local Iwi and the Māori community, complete with intricately carved waharoa. Uniting Māori and Pakeha, or non-indigenous cultures, is a central exhibition hall. One of the six founding principles upon which Te Papa Tongarewa was built on was the acknowledgment of “Mana Taonga,” the cultural treasure of the indigenous people of New Zealand. Communicating “deep truths about our people,” Mana Taonga reflects Māori knowledge, language, and customs.
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2020-12-26   464 Zobrazenia
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2020-12-26

The Spiritual Dimension of Development is Inescapable: A Message of Healing from the Native American Chief Phil Lane Jr. (Veg advocate)

00:11:15

The Spiritual Dimension of Development is Inescapable: A Message of Healing from the Native American Chief Phil Lane Jr. (Veg advocate)

The Honorable Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr. is a member of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations. He is formally recognized by elders from across North America as a hereditary chief, owing to his noble lineage of leadership and longtime service to Indigenous peoples and greater humanity. For his tireless contributions, Chief Lane has received many awards, such as the Windstar Award and the Swiss Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights’ International Award. Today, we are privileged to introduce The Honorable Chief Phil Lane Jr., who will share some of his personal experiences, which led him on the path of unbounded wisdom, beautifully linked with Native American prophecies about a new revival, giving hope not just to the Native American Nations, but also to the world as a whole. “The Four Worlds International Institute goes way, way, way back, deep in our prophecies. It really began when my life changed in 1967. When my heart was so full of anger and hatred about what had happened to our people here. All people, really. All members of our human family that had been needlessly hurt and killed − we can’t have that. And so, that led me really into a life of trying to kill that pain with alcohol and something like that. But I encountered a very sacred, very, very sacred prayer; and that was like fire started burning inside me. And I’m sure we all have that spiritual awakening, that time when we awaken, and understand and feel oneness.” “By 1982, in Turtle Island, which is now called Canada and United States, both culturally and physically, our indigenous people had fallen into a deep, deep, deep, deep pain; deep alcoholism. And so, we were really at a point of suffering. But we knew in our prophecies that there would be a huge turning point, but there were signs on the way.” “So, in 1982, we were approached by the new director of what they call the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program in Canada, NNADAP. And we wanted to bring – as never before − a council together, and to ask them the question: ‘How can we come out of this deep, deep, deep hole we’re in, of darkness?’” “The elders said this. They said: ‘The moral, the spiritual dimension of development is inescapable. You cannot build healthy communities, healthy nations, healthy families, healthy human beings, on lies and greed and selfishness. They have to be built in kindness, compassion, forgiveness, respect, justice. That’s the foundation.’”
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2020-11-04   815 Zobrazenia
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2020-11-04
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