Search
English
Title
  • English
  • 正體中文
  • 简体中文
  • Deutsch
  • Español
  • Français
  • Magyar
  • 日本語
  • 한국어
  • Монгол хэл
  • Âu Lạc
  • български
  • bahasa Melayu
  • فارسی
  • Português
  • Română
  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • ไทย
  • العربية
  • čeština
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • русский
  • తెలుగు లిపి
  • हिन्दी
  • polski
  • italiano
  • Wikang Tagalog
  • Українська Мова
  • Others
  • English
  • 正體中文
  • 简体中文
  • Deutsch
  • Español
  • Français
  • Magyar
  • 日本語
  • 한국어
  • Монгол хэл
  • Âu Lạc
  • български
  • bahasa Melayu
  • فارسی
  • Português
  • Română
  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • ไทย
  • العربية
  • čeština
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • русский
  • తెలుగు లిపి
  • हिन्दी
  • polski
  • italiano
  • Wikang Tagalog
  • Українська Мова
  • Others
Title
Transcript
Up Next
 

Finding the Truth – Excerpts from “Essays, First Series” by Ralph Waldo Emerson (vegetarian), Part 2 of 2

2024-02-06
Details
Download Docx
Read More
Let us continue with excerpts from the essay “Intellect,” where the wise philosopher expounds on how to understand the teachings of the ancient Masters.

“[…] The constructive powers are rare and it is given to few men to be poets, yet every man is a receiver of this descending holy spirit, and may well study the laws of its influx. Exactly parallel is the whole rule of intellectual duty to the rule of moral duty. A self-denial no less austere than the saint’s is demanded of the scholar. He must worship truth, and forego all things for that. He in whom the love of truth predominates will keep himself aloof from all moorings, and afloat. He will abstain from dogmatism, and recognize all the opposite negations between which, as walls, his being is swung. He submits to the inconvenience of suspense and imperfect opinion, but he is a candidate for truth, […] and respects the highest law of his being.”

“Every man’s progress is through a succession of teachers, each of whom seems at the time to have a superlative influence, but it at last gives place to a new. Frankly let him accept it all. Jesus says, Leave father, mother, house and lands, and follow me. Who leaves all, receives more. This is as true intellectually as morally. Each new mind we approach seems to require an abdication of all our past and present possessions. A new doctrine seems at first a subversion of all our opinions, tastes, and manner of living. Such has Swedenborg, such has Kant, such has Coleridge, such has Hegel or his interpreter Cousin seemed to many young men in this country. Take thankfully and heartily all they can give. Exhaust them, wrestle with them, let them not go until their blessing be won, and after a short season the dismay will be overpast, the excess of influence withdrawn, and they will be no longer an alarming meteor, but one more bright star shining serenely in your Heaven and blending its light with all your day. […]”
Share
Share To
Embed
Start Time
Download
Mobile
Mobile
iPhone
Android
Watch in mobile browser
GO
GO
Prompt
OK
App
Scan the QR code,
or choose the right phone system to download
iPhone
Android