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The Typewriter: A Revolutionary Invention of Its Time, Part 2 of 2

2022-09-13
Limba:English
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In our previous episode, we discovered the history of the typewriter, and today we’ll explore the machine’s impact on women's economic independence, typewriter collections, both privately and publicly owned, artwork created by typing numbers and characters, and more.

The need for a faster way to write documents combined with the increased production of typewriters created a great demand for typists. Typing classes were organized for women who wanted to change from conventional factory work or teaching, to holding secretarial jobs in offices. Secretarial jobs opened up new opportunities as they offered better salaries and thus economic emancipation.

Although typewriters are seldom used today, their mechanical structure and history are quite fascinating. Museums and individuals collect and showcase various models of typewriters in countries such as Spain, England, Scotland, Switzerland, Canada, the United States, and China. Virtual museums and dedicated websites also have extensive catalogues and pictures profiling the different types of typewriters. Perhaps the largest collection of the machines is housed at the Peter Mitterhofer Typewriter Museum in Partschins, Italy, where more than 1,500 models built from 1864 to 1980 are on display, offering a comprehensive review of the typewriter’s history.

One of the first surviving typewriter artworks was created in 1898 by a British woman, Flora Stacey, a highly successful teacher of typewriting, shorthand, and music. She used a Royal Bar-Lock typewriter to create her Butterfly design, composed of brackets, dashes, slashes, and an asterisk.

The first time the typewriter was used as a musical instrument was in 1950 when the US conductor, arranger, and composer Leroy Anderson wrote a composition called “The Typewriter.” His piece has been played widely in Europe and the United States.

To celebrate the significant role of the typewriter in world history, as well as in US history, June 23 was designated as National Typewriter Day, the same date when inventor Christopher Latham Sholes was granted a patent for his typewriter in 1868.

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Toate părțile  (2/2)
1
2022-09-06
1210 vizionări
2
2022-09-13
718 vizionări
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