Search
English
Title
  • English
  • 正體中文
  • 简体中文
  • Deutsch
  • Español
  • Français
  • Magyar
  • 日本語
  • 한국어
  • Монгол хэл
  • Âu Lạc
  • български
  • bahasa Melayu
  • فارسی
  • Português
  • Română
  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • ไทย
  • العربية
  • čeština
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • русский
  • తెలుగు లిపి
  • हिन्दी
  • polski
  • italiano
  • Wikang Tagalog
  • Українська Мова
  • Others
  • English
  • 正體中文
  • 简体中文
  • Deutsch
  • Español
  • Français
  • Magyar
  • 日本語
  • 한국어
  • Монгол хэл
  • Âu Lạc
  • български
  • bahasa Melayu
  • فارسی
  • Português
  • Română
  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • ไทย
  • العربية
  • čeština
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • русский
  • తెలుగు లిపి
  • हिन्दी
  • polski
  • italiano
  • Wikang Tagalog
  • Українська Мова
  • Others
Title
Transcript
Up Next
 

Turning Back the Clock: The Plant-Based Diet's Anti-Aging Effects on Telomeres

2024-02-28
Details
Download Docx
Read More
Telomeres, located at the termini of chromosomes, are essential segments of DNA responsible for preserving the integrity of our genetic material. Chromosomes, the organized bundles of DNA found within the nucleus of our cells, serve as the blueprint for our entire body. When it comes to DNA, telomeres play a critical part by preventing the fraying or degradation of genetic information during the process of cell division. As cells divide and replicate, chromosomes help ensure that the genetic instructions are faithfully passed on to the new cells. However, as cells divide, the process of DNA replication is not perfect, and a small portion of the telomeric DNA is unable to be replicated. Consequently, with each cell division, the telomeres progressively shorten. The average cell is estimated to divide between 50 and 70 times before reaching a point known as replicative senescence, where the telomeres become critically short. When this happens, cells may either enter a state of dormancy or undergo programmed cell death, known as apoptosis.

But how can we preserve the length of these crucial telomeres? Recent research has discovered a connection between telomere length and a common aspect of our diet — the pigments found in fruits and vegetables. A study published in the European Journal of Nutrition found a positive association between blood carotenoid levels and the length of telomeres in white blood cells among US adults. Those who enjoy a diet rich in carotenoids, the organic pigments responsible for the vibrant colors of produce, tend to showcase longer telomeres.

Dr. Luigi Fontana, co-director of the longevity research program at Washington University in St. Louis, United States, emphasizes that while genetics contribute to about 25% of the risk of death, 75% is most likely attributed to diet, underscoring its significance. The encouraging news is that adopting a vegan diet goes beyond elongating telomeres; it has been shown to prevent, decrease, or even reverse the onset of serious chronic diseases.

Beyond maintaining a vegan diet, it's crucial to recognize the significance of regular exercise, as studies have demonstrated its potential to extend telomeres. Research indicates a positive correlation between higher levels of physical activity and longer telomeres, a trend particularly noticeable in older individuals. Furthermore, athletes tend to exhibit longer telomeres compared to non-athletes.

Chronic stress has been associated with accelerated telomere shortening, while practices such as meditation, yoga, and deep-breathing exercises have demonstrated benefits in coping with life’s pressures and potentially supporting telomere maintenance. Other lifestyle factors play a key role in the maintenance of telomeres. Quality sleep, usually ranging from 7 to 9 hours per night, is a vital contributor to telomere health, as scientific studies have found a link between restful sleep and longer telomeres.
Share
Share To
Embed
Start Time
Download
Mobile
Mobile
iPhone
Android
Watch in mobile browser
GO
GO
Prompt
OK
App
Scan the QR code,
or choose the right phone system to download
iPhone
Android