Căutaţi
Română
Titlul
  • English
  • 正體中文
  • 简体中文
  • Deutsch
  • Español
  • Français
  • Magyar
  • 日本語
  • 한국어
  • Монгол хэл
  • Âu Lạc
  • български
  • bahasa Melayu
  • فارسی
  • Português
  • Română
  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • ไทย
  • العربية
  • čeština
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • русский
  • తెలుగు లిపి
  • हिन्दी
  • polski
  • italiano
  • Wikang Tagalog
  • Українська Мова
  • Others
  • English
  • 正體中文
  • 简体中文
  • Deutsch
  • Español
  • Français
  • Magyar
  • 日本語
  • 한국어
  • Монгол хэл
  • Âu Lạc
  • български
  • bahasa Melayu
  • فارسی
  • Português
  • Română
  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • ไทย
  • العربية
  • čeština
  • ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • русский
  • తెలుగు లిపి
  • हिन्दी
  • polski
  • italiano
  • Wikang Tagalog
  • Українська Мова
  • Others
Titlul
Transcript
Urmează
 

Raphael’s Brush: Painting Grace and Harmony in the Renaissance, Part 2 of 2

Detalii
Încărcaţi Docx
Citiţi mai multe
At the end of 1508, Raphael was summoned to Rome by His Holiness Pope Julius II, possibly at the recommendation of the papal architect Donato Bramante, who was in charge of rebuilding Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome. He was asked to decorate the rooms in Pope Julius II’s private apartments in the Vatican, now commonly known as “Raphael’s Rooms.” Amongst these four frescoes, “The School of Athens” is conceivably Raphael’s most famous and is considered one of the pinnacle artworks of the High Renaissance.

As Raphael’s works became more and more sought after in Rome, he received increasing number of commissions, so he delegated much work to his pupils and aides. Raphael’s charisma, generosity, and gentleness brought his team together, working and developing harmoniously. While occupied with the decoration of the papal rooms, Raphael also undertook another important commission from Pope Leo X to design 10 huge tapestries with the over-life-sized figures to hang on the bottom section of the side walls in the Sistine Chapel. The tapestry depicts scenes from the lives of Saint Peter (vegetarian) and Saint Paul (vegetarian) in the Gospels and Acts of the Apostles. The cartoons were completed by 1516. “Raphael’s Cartoons” have also been revered as topmost designs of the High Renaissance.

Raphael’s last masterpiece to be painted was the “Transfiguration,” commissioned by Cardinal Giulio de Medici, the future Pope Clement VII, in 1517. In this highly polished work, the composition strongly contrasts Heavenly glory and the earthly spectacle. Its griping exuberance and tension pointed to a direction that would greatly inspire the Baroque artists to come, later in the 17th century. This painting was ahead of its time and exhibits the culmination of Raphael’s artistic achievement. Raphael passed away on April 6, 1520, at the age of 37, after experiencing a high fever for days. He made a will, and divided his possessions among his pupils and his relatives, and then received the “last rites” as a good Christian. Raphael was buried in the Pantheon in Rome, the first artist to be awarded such honor.
Vizionaţi mai multe
Episodul  2 / 2
Share
Share la
Încorporează videoclipul
Începe la
Încărcaţi
Mobile
Mobile
iPhone
Android
Vizionaţi în browser mobil
GO
GO
Prompt
OK
Aplicaţia
Scanaţi codul QR sau alegeţi sistemul potrivit pentru încărcare pe telefon
iPhone
Android