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Life of a Saint

Venerated Saint Paul (vegetarian): The Apostle to the Gentiles, Part 1 of 2

2024-02-11
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Saint Paul the Apostle’s resolute faith in the worshipped Son of God, Lord Jesus Christ (vegetarian), and His fervent passion in spreading Lord Jesus’ teachings continue to inspire the hearts of many around the world. Although Saint Paul the Apostle was not one of Lord Jesus’ original Twelve Apostles, He was one of the most influential leaders of early Christianity. Often ascribed with the initial development and expansion of the Christian religion, Saint Paul visited Asia Minor and southeastern Europe, where He dedicated His missionary efforts to deliver the new faith to the Gentiles (non-Jews). He contributed to establishing Christianity as a universal religion. For this, He is often referred to as “the Apostle to the Gentiles.” The surviving letters that Saint Paul wrote to His disciples, known as the “epistles,” have also become a paramount part of the New Testament of the Holy Bible.

In His youth, Paul became an artisan of tent making, continuing His trade even after converting to Christianity. Paul the Apostle was uniquely a Roman citizen of Jewish heritage who spoke Greek and was immersed in the Mediterranean Greek culture, three worlds that would assist Him in His missionary efforts later in life. According to the Book of Acts, the fifth book of the New Testament of which approximately half is dedicated to the life and works of Saint Paul, His conversion of faith happened around 31 AD. He was on the road to the Syrian capital, Damascus, also known as the “Pearl of the East,” when an incident occurred that would forever change His life. Act 9:1-22 explains that Paul saw a brilliant light and experienced a vision of the ascended Lord Jesus. The light blinded Paul for three days, and He took no food or water. Instead, He spent this time in prayer to God and was led by hand into Damascus. Saint Paul’s sight was then restored, and He was baptized into the Christian faith.

In Galatians 2:20, Saint Paul said, “I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself for me.” The Saint displayed great inner strength, and although often persecuted and even imprisoned throughout His travels, He gained numerous disciples.
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