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Love of Existence and Knowledge: From “The City of God” by Saint Augustine of Hippo (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

00:11:50

Love of Existence and Knowledge: From “The City of God” by Saint Augustine of Hippo (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

Saint Augustine of Hippo was an esteemed late 4th and early 5th century Christian bishop in present-day Algeria. He became Bishop of Hippo, an ancient seaport city, in his early 40s, and remained in the position for the rest of his life. Known as one of the greatest Christian philosophers, St. Augustine was a prolific writer, with about 100 books, 300 letters and 500 sermons still preserved. His work covers subjects including theology, philosophy and sociology and has had a lasting influence on the Christian world. Among his most significant writings are “The City of God,” “De Doctrina Christiana” and “Confessions.” The respected bishop was also a compassionate vegetarian, and drew attention to the lifestyle of those who “not only abstain from flesh and wine, but also from other viands. … which flatter taste.” Today, we will open Saint Augustine’s book “The City of God,” to read a selection of insights on the universal gift of existence, which by itself gives us an awareness, which no living creature would trade for anything else. “And truly the very fact of existing is by some natural spell so pleasant, that even the wretched are, for no other reason, unwilling to perish; and, when they feel that they are wretched, wish not that they themselves be annihilated, but that their misery be so.” “The well-known feeling of such men witnesses to this. For when we see that they fear to die, and will rather live in such misfortune than end it by death, is it not obvious enough how nature shrinks from annihilation?” “And how much human nature loves the knowledge of its existence, and how it shrinks from being deceived, will be sufficiently understood from this fact, that every man prefers to grieve in a sane mind, rather than to be glad in madness. And this grand and wonderful instinct belongs to men alone of all animals; for, though some of them have keener eyesight than ourselves for this world’s light, they cannot attain to that spiritual Light with which our mind is somehow irradiated, so that we can form right judgments of all things. For our power to judge is proportioned to our acceptance of this Light…”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-16   253 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-16

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 2 of 2

00:10:16

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 2 of 2

We now present “Song of Love” from the book The Songs of Twilight by Victor Hugo. “If there be a velvet grassy expanse By dewdrops pearly dressed, Where through all seasons Flowers by bees care, Where one may gather, Roses, honeysuckle, lily white, I gladly would make of it a site For thy foot to rest. If there be a loving heart Where Honor rules the breast, Loyal and true in every part, That changes never molest, Eager to run its noble race, Intend to do some work of grace, I gladly would make of it a place For thy brow to rest. And if there be of love a dream Which shows, – A something sweet and blessed, – A dream that mingles, I gladly of it would make the goal Where thy mind should rest.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-12   252 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-12

Selections from Jagatguru Adi Shankaracharya’s Hymns – "Shivananda Lahari," Part 1 of 2

00:12:53

Selections from Jagatguru Adi Shankaracharya’s Hymns – "Shivananda Lahari," Part 1 of 2

Born in 8th Century India, Jagatguru Adi Shankaracharya showed an early interest in spiritual life. By age eight, He had read and understood all of the Vedic scriptures. After receiving permission to leave home in pursuit of spiritual attainment, He met and received instruction from Guru Govinda Bhagavatpada. Shankaracharya went on to write commentaries on the ancient doctrine, “Advaita Vedanta” as well as the “Bhagavad Gita” and the ten principal Upanishads. He became known as the founder of the Smartha tradition, which brought together several branches of the Hindu faith and highlights the oneness of the inner Self (Atman) with the Supreme God (Nirguna Brahman). Shankaracharya also composed 72 hymns of praise and reverence for the Divine, dedicated to Lord Krishna and Lord Shiva. “Shivananda Lahari,” or “Waves of the Bliss of Shiva,” is one of the devotional hymns composed by Adi Shankaracharya. “Oh Lord Shambu, who grants us happiness, Let these waves of ecstasy of Lord Shiva, Flowing from the holy history of yours, Calming the dusts of sin forever, Rushing from the canals of wisdom, Falling into the whirlpool of life, Dousing the fires of sorrow, Living in my heart as senses, Be always victorious. I pray with all my heart, Him who is known by the three Vedas, Him who is pleasant to the mind, Him who is first among everything, Him who has all seeing three eyes, Him who carries the weight of matted lock, With eminence great, Him who wears the moving snake as necklace, Him who holds the jumping deer in his hand, Him who is greatest among devas, Him who shines with glitter, Him who has mercy on me, Him who is the Lord of all beings, Him who is the only support to holy wisdom, Him who is always with my Goddess, And Him who is a great entertainer.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-01   251 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-01

Self and Soul: From The Sanctuary of Self - Rosicrucian Order Library, Part 1 of 2

00:15:34

Self and Soul: From The Sanctuary of Self - Rosicrucian Order Library, Part 1 of 2

The Ancient Mystical Order Rosae Crucis, also known as the Rosicrucian Order, AMORC, is a worldwide cultural, educational, and philosophical organization that is perpetuating the profound and practical teachings of the Rosicrucians. These teachings, as passed down and added to over the centuries, from ancient Egypt to Europe and now all over the world, pertain to the mysteries of the universe, nature, and humans themselves. Today, we will read from chapter III, “Self and Soul,” from Part One entitled, “The Mysteries,” in Frater Ralph M. Lewis’s book, “The Sanctuary of Self.” A detailed and comprehensive explanation is offered in this chapter, on the nature of consciousness and human’s awareness. “It is commonly said that we feel self, but such is a verisimilitude (the appearance of truth). The fact is that the sensations of self are not like those we derive from the touch of an object. To self, there are no sensations of hot, cold, hard, or soft, nor are there sensations of pain or pleasure. You realize that you are you, quite aside from such experiences. This consciousness of self, then, is a consciousness of our consciousness.” “The consciousness has thresholds. By thresholds, we mean the points at which certain effects or sensations begin to occur in the brain. The thresholds for the impulses of sound and sight, for example, are considerably lower than those of the vague impressions of self. Consequently, it is comparatively easy to lose a realization of self, if the grosser impulses of the sense organs dominate the consciousness of the brain. In other words, if the consciousness is exposed to a bombardment of sounds and an excitation of visual impressions, we know from our own experience that we lose momentarily, a realization of self in these physical perceptions of the objective consciousness. Only when the thresholds of the receptor senses are partially blocked or suppressed, do we become fully aware of those more subtle impressions, which reach the higher thresholds of the brain consciousness, and which we experience as self.” “The activities of self, the realities of our inner being, are more complex in this sense than are those particulars of the material or everyday world which we experience. If, for analogy, the Cosmic order or God, whichever you please, is the synthesis of everything, then that God obviously is complex — infinite in substance and in variety. If we become conscious of the complex, or the greater evolvements or manifestations of His nature, the closer is our intimacy with Him, the more of Him we experience.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-12   248 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-12

Selections of Mystic Verses of Tulsi Sahib (vegetarian), Saint of Hathras, Part 1 of 2

00:11:12

Selections of Mystic Verses of Tulsi Sahib (vegetarian), Saint of Hathras, Part 1 of 2

Born in India in the 18th Century, Param Sant Tulsi Sahib showed very early interest in spiritual life. Rather than accept a position of royalty in his family, He departed from home in pursuit of meditation practice and became fully realized soon after. In poetry and other writings, Param Sant Tulsi Sahib described the brilliance and penetrating wisdom of the inner life. At the same time, He emphasized that a living Master is necessary to access this direct connection with the Kingdom of God. We will now share with you, “Selections of Mystic Verses of Tulsi Sahib (vegetarian), Saint of Hathras.” “At the outset, I offer salutation to my Lord, the Satguru; In surrender at His feet, Tulsi loses himself in ecstasy. I pay homage in all humility at the feet of my Master, Whose grace has revealed the mystery of (inner Heavenly) Light and Sound. I offer myself in adoration to the Saints, Who have bestowed on my soul the power to see. The brilliant light of surrender has revealed unto me The essence and the true form of my Master.” “Thou art all Knowledge, the sole object of my worship. One with the Infinite and the Beyond art Thou, O Master. Satguru is the true Lord, imperishable and supreme; Seeing my miserable state, He cut asunder the noose of death. He has given me shelter at His lotus feet within. He has made my soul His own humble slave. He has turned my surat (soul) and nirat (attention) unto Himself; With loving devotion, I surrender myself at His feet.” “How can I ever describe the greatness of my Master? He has given my soul the key to the Inaccessible. The vision of the Invisible has enchanted my soul. Through the grace of the Saints I have recognized the Master. Piercing the granite wall, my soul enjoys bliss divine; Intoxicated with joy, I dwell forever at His lotus feet. The indigent Tulsi knows naught else. In the thought of his Master, he remains absorbed. My Master has given to me knowledge of the self; Time and again my soul ascends to celestial regions. Traversing the regions within, I beheld the Cosmos; The beginning and the end of Time stand revealed to me. The beginning and the end of creation that He sees within. Verily, of that experience does Tulsi give a description. The Universe is contained within the human frame, Tulsi has himself seen what to others is beyond reach. Not only the macrocosm within the microcosm did I behold. But, piercing the veil, I also perceived the One pervading all. Within the body, Tulsi has seen the Invisible Being; Knowing the unfathomable One, he narrates the wondrous tale. The Universe is contained within the human body, Tulsi has revealed this Truth to all seekers.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-23   243 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-23

Selections from “The World’s Advance Thought” – a Periodical by Lucy A. Mallory (vegetarian): The New Dispensation, Part 1 of 2

00:13:02

Selections from “The World’s Advance Thought” – a Periodical by Lucy A. Mallory (vegetarian): The New Dispensation, Part 1 of 2

“The Spirited Monthly Newspaper – The World’s Advance Thought” was a monthly periodical founded by Lucy A. Mallory in 1886. The paper’s motto was “Love is the way, the truth, and the life.” Mrs. Lucy Mallory contributed her own spiritual writings as well as the inspired contributions of others. She served as writer, editor and publisher of the paper, which had an international readership that included renowned Russian author and vegetarian, Leo Tolstoy. Through this uplifting publication, Lucy Mallory highlighted themes that emphasized the “inner light” of the human being. She also advocated vegetarianism for its loving kindness to other beings. We now share with you selections from the periodical – “The World’s Advance Thought.” “The thought planted in your mind is a seed, and it will grow there and bear fruit of the same kind as the seed you planted. Good thought seeds bear fruit that give good. ‘As ye sow, so shall ye reap.’ Constructive planting is reaping its harvest. Destructive sowing is reaping its harvest. The present-day man has come to his limit. Now comes a Superior Being who will bring the whole world into Divine Union. The Mighty Power of Love shall work its Wonders, and Peace - Divine Peace - shall reign! Spiritualism has rooted now, and will soon begin to bear Spiritual Fruit. The public memory is now going to be long on Good, and short on bad.” “The human soul’s demand for truth being eternally continuous, and the supply being eternally inexhaustible, it is impossible to formulate abiding religious systems of perfection. While a religious system, as a moral influence, may be above the spiritual thought of the mass of its faithful followers, the spiritual thought of individuals will ever be above the most advanced religious system. Creeds, in their highest forms and purest conditions, cannot from the very nature of things dispense and conserve the highest spiritual truth; they express past conceptions, and must, therefore, ever be behind the most advanced spiritual thought.” “The Light that lights every one that comes into the world, and all intelligences above and below, as well as in the degree of the individual, is spiritual consciousness. The season has its degree, as has the planet, and the object of the experiences, each and all, is to expand and extend the consciousness.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-11-05   243 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-11-05

Selections from Writings of Shoghi Effendi (vegetarian): “The Promised Day Is Come,” Part 2 of 2

00:13:59

Selections from Writings of Shoghi Effendi (vegetarian): “The Promised Day Is Come,” Part 2 of 2

“‘Bestir yourselves, O people,’ is, on the one hand, the ominous warning sounded by Bahá’u’lláh Himself, ‘in anticipation of the days of Divine Justice, for the promised hour is now come.’ ‘Abandon that which ye possess, and seize that which God, Who layeth low the necks of men, hath brought. Know ye of a certainty that if ye turn not back from that which ye have committed, chastisement will overtake you on every side, and ye shall behold things more grievous than that which ye beheld aforetime.’ And again: ‘We have fixed a time for you, O people! If ye fail, at the appointed hour, to turn towards God, He, verily, will lay hold on you.’ And again: ‘God assuredly dominates the lives of them that wronged Us, and is well aware of their doings. He will most certainly lay hold on them for their sins.’ And finally: ‘O ye peoples of the world! Know verily that an unforeseen calamity is following you and that grievous retribution awaiteth you. Think not the deeds ye have committed have been blotted from My sight. By My Beauty! All your doings hath My pen graven with open characters upon tablets of golden stone.’ ‘The whole Earth,’ Bahá’u’lláh, on the other hand, forecasting the bright future in store for a world now wrapt in darkness, emphatically asserts, ‘is now in a state of pregnancy. The day is approaching when it will have yielded its noblest fruits, when from it will have sprung forth the loftiest trees, the most enchanting blossoms, the most heavenly blessings.’ ‘The time is approaching when every created thing will have cast its burden. Glorified be God Who hath vouchsafed this grace that encompasses all things, whether seen or unseen!’ ‘These great oppressions,’ He, moreover, foreshadowing humanity’s Golden Age, has written, ‘are preparing it for the advent of the Most Great Justice.’ This Most Great Justice is indeed the Justice upon which the structure of the Most Great Peace can alone, and must eventually, rest, while the Most Great Peace will, in turn, usher in that Most Great, that World Civilization which shall remain forever associated with Him Who beareth the Most Great Name.” “‘We verily,’ He Himself has testified, ‘have not fallen short of Our duty to exhort men, and to deliver that whereunto I was bidden by God, the Almighty, the All-Praised. Had they hearkened unto Me, they would have beheld the earth another earth.’ And again: ‘Is there any excuse left for anyone in this Revelation? No, by God, the Lord of the Mighty Throne! My signs have encompassed the earth, and My power enveloped all mankind, and yet the people are wrapped in a strange sleep!’”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-12-17   243 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-12-17

God is Love: From Thoughts in Solitude by the Reverend Thomas Merton (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

00:14:34

God is Love: From Thoughts in Solitude by the Reverend Thomas Merton (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

The Reverend Thomas Merton, an important Catholic mystic and spiritual thinker, was born in 1915, to a New Zealand father and an American mother. The many life situations he encountered in his youth led him to explore religion and spirituality and eventually to devote his life to God by becoming a monk, and later a deacon, at the Abbey of Gethsemani, a part of the Order of Trappists, in Kentucky,
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-12-28   242 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-12-28

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 1 of 2

00:12:02

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 1 of 2

Internationally, Victor Hugo is best known for his popular novels like “Notre-Dame de Paris” (“The Hunchback of Notre-Dame”) and “Les Misérables,” which have also inspired famous movies and musicals. But especially in his native France, Victor Hugo is also regarded as one of the greatest poets. Above all, Hugo's words have the power to move the common person's soul. Today we would like to share with you spiritual poems by Victor Hugo. "When my mind, on the ocean of poetry hurled, Floats on in repose round this wonderful world, Oft the sacred fire from heaven - Mysterious sun, that gives light to the soul – Strikes mine with its ray."
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-11   240 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-11

The City of God by Saint Augustine of Hippo (vegetarian): The True Mediator - Selection from Book IX and X, Part 1 of 2

00:12:07

The City of God by Saint Augustine of Hippo (vegetarian): The True Mediator - Selection from Book IX and X, Part 1 of 2

Saint Augustine of Hippo was an esteemed late 4th and early 5th century Christian bishop in present-day Algeria. Known as one of the greatest Christian philosophers, St. Augustine was a prolific writer, with about 100 books, 300 letters and 500 sermons still preserved. Among his most significant writings are “The City of God,” “De Doctrina Christiana” and “Confessions.” The respected bishop was also a compassionate vegetarian, and drew attention to the lifestyle of those who “not only abstain from flesh and wine, but also from other viands. …which flatter taste.” Today, we’ll read excerpts from Saint Augustine of Hippo’s book “The City of God.” “We need a Mediator Who, being united to us here below by the mortality of His body, should at the same time be able to afford us truly Divine help in cleansing and liberating us by means of the immortal righteousness of His Spirit, whereby He remained Heavenly even while here upon earth. Far be it from the in contaminable God to fear pollution from the man He assumed, or from the men among whom He lived in the form of a man. For, though His incarnation showed us nothing else, these two wholesome facts were enough, that true Divinity cannot be polluted by flesh, and that demons are not to be considered better than ourselves because they have not flesh. This, then, as Scripture says, is the ‘Mediator between God and man, the man Christ Jesus,’ of whose Divinity, whereby He is equal to the Father, and humanity, whereby He has become like us.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-05-27   234 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-05-27

Selections from Zoroastrianism’s Sacred Menog-i Khrad: Chapters 47- 63, Part 1 of 2

00:12:17

Selections from Zoroastrianism’s Sacred Menog-i Khrad: Chapters 47- 63, Part 1 of 2

Zoroaster was a prophet who lived in ancient Iran around 1800 BC. The teachings that emerged from His visions of God have become known as Zoroastrianism. Zoroastrian theology’s main tenets include the existence of one God and the personal happiness or reward that is the natural outcome of using one’s free will to formulate good thoughts, good words and good deeds. Respecting all life, Zoroaster was Himself a pure vegetarian and forbade all animal sacrifice. His universal philosophy is believed to have influenced Greek thought and major revealed religions of the world. Today, we invite you to listen to excerpts of chapters 47-63 from “Menog-i Khrad” (The Spirit of Wisdom), one of the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism. CHAPTER 47 “It is wisdom which is better than the wealth of every kind which is in the world. It is destiny that is predominant over everyone and everything. CHAPTER 49 “Because, as to the creatures and creations of every kind, that the creator Ohrmazd created for the worldly existence, which are procreative and also which are developable, for every single body there is its own single guardian spirit of a like nature. And the motion of the sun and moon is the special illumination of the world, and the maturing of procreations and growths of all kinds. And the correct keeping of the day, month, and year, summer and winter, spring and autumn, and other calculations and accounts of all kinds which men ought to obtain, perceive, and understand, are more fully defined by means of the setting of the sun and moon.” CHAPTER 52 “For the existence of renunciation of sin, the special thing is this, that one commits no sin voluntarily; and if, through folly, or weakness and ignorance, a sin occurs, he is then in renunciation of sin before the high-priests and the good. And after that, when he does not commit it, then that sin which is committed by him becomes swept from his body; just as the wind which is hasty and mighty, when it comes swift and strong, sweeps so over the plain that it carries away every single blade of grass and anything which is broken in that place.” CHAPTER 57 “The knowledge and sagacity of the worldly existence, the learning and teaching in every profession, and all advancement of temporal beings are through wisdom. The souls of the righteous, in escaping from hades and coming to heaven and the supreme heaven arrive much better by means of the power and protection of wisdom. And it is possible to seek the good living, good repute, and every happiness of people in the worldly existence, through the power of wisdom.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-10   233 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-10

Stoicism as a Way of Life - Selection from Epictetus’ Enchiridion, Part 2 of 2

00:14:07

Stoicism as a Way of Life - Selection from Epictetus’ Enchiridion, Part 2 of 2

Today, we continue with a selection from Epictetus’ teachings, as recorded by his student Arrian, in the book “The Enchiridion.” The Stoic sage gives more guidelines on how to live a life of freedom and one in harmony with nature. “If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and dull with regard to externals. Do not desire to be thought to know anything; and though you should appear to others to be somebody, distrust yourself. For be assured, it is not easy at once to keep your will in harmony with nature and to secure externals; but while you are absorbed in the one, you must of necessity neglect the other.” “A master is he who is able to confer or remove whatever that man seeks or shuns. Whoever then would be free, let him wish nothing, let him decline nothing, which depends on others; else he must necessarily be a slave.” “And if you do not so much as take the things which are set before you, but are able even to forego them, then you will not only be worthy to feast with the gods, but to rule with them also. For, by thus doing, Diogenes and Heraclitus, and others like them, deservedly became divine, and were so recognized.” “As far as conversation goes, however, do not disdain to accommodate yourself to him and, if need be, to groan with him. Take heed, however, not to groan inwardly, too. ‘Remember that you are an actor in a drama of such sort as the Author chooses — if short, then in a short one; if long, then in a long one. If it be His pleasure that you should enact a poor man, or a cripple, or a ruler, or a private citizen, see that you act it well. For this is your business — to act well the given part, but to choose it belongs to another.’” “Now, for your part, do not have a supercilious look indeed, but keep steadily to those things which appear best to you, as one appointed by God to this particular station. For remember that, if you are persistent, those very persons who at first ridiculed will afterwards admire you. But if you are conquered by them, you will incur a double ridicule.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-20   232 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-20

Selections from Zoroastrianism’s Sacred Menog-i Khrad: Chapters 47- 63, Part 2 of 2

00:12:54

Selections from Zoroastrianism’s Sacred Menog-i Khrad: Chapters 47- 63, Part 2 of 2

CHAPTER 57 “‘the heaven which is in the place of good thoughts, the place of good words, the place of good deeds, and the perfect supreme heaven of all gloriousness, the path of the spirits and worldly existences, and the Chinwad bridge are produced and allotted through the power of wisdom.’ ‘and Ohrmazd's creatures' thoroughly understanding the nature of heaven and hades, the compassion of Ohrmazd the archangels, and other angels as regards their own creatures, and the devastation and destructiveness of Ahriman and the demons as regards the creatures of Ohrmazd it is possible to comprehend through the more complete power of wisdom. And the good religion of the Mazda-worshippers, the sayings and teaching of the spirits, and the demons' demolishing the worldly body and making it imperceptible by the sight of men are apprehended more fully by means of the most perfect means of wisdom.’ ‘And as to every man whose participation in wisdom is much, his share of Heaven is then much more. Even as to Vishtasp, Zoroaster, Gayomard, and those others whose share of Heaven was much greater on account of much wisdom coming unto them. And as to Yim, Faridoon, Kay Us, and those other rulers who obtained splendor and mightiness from the sacred beings just as the participation of Vishtasp and other rulers in the religion occurred - and their not attaining to the religion, and also as to the times when they have become ungrateful unto their own lord, it was on account of the little coming of wisdom unto them.’” CHAPTER 60 “‘Because it is said, that whoever joins with the good brings good with him, and whoever joins with the bad brings evil just like the wind which, when it comes upon stench, is stench, and when it comes upon perfume,is perfume, it is, therefore, notorious, that he whose business is with the good receives good, and he whose business is with the bad receives evil; but, even then, both are to be considered as an experiment.’” CHAPTER 63 “To be grateful in the world, and to wish happiness for everyone. This is greater and better than every good work, and no commotion whatever is necessary for its performance.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-11   232 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-11

Obedience and Righteousness before the Lord: Selection from the Holy Tanakh’s Book of Samuel, Part 1 of 2

00:16:09

Obedience and Righteousness before the Lord: Selection from the Holy Tanakh’s Book of Samuel, Part 1 of 2

Judaism’s history begins around 2000 BCE with the Covenant between God (Elohim) and Abraham. Over a thousand years later, as the Jewish faithful Believe, God's (Elohim’s) laws and commandments were revealed to Prophet Moses on Mount Sinai, forming the Torah, which is the first part of the Hebrew Bible. The Hebrew Bible, or Tanakh, and the ancient writings of the Talmud, embody the beliefs and practices of Judaism. Present in every aspect of the religion is a single, omniscient, and compassionate God (Elohim). The Holy Tanakh’s Book of Samuel is the third book in the Neviim (Prophets), and the second section of the Holy Tanakh. Filled with succinct messages through the depicted stories, the Book of Samuel is dedicated to giving the right directions for those who seek their way to God. Today, we will read excerpts from Chapters 15, 16 and 18 from the Book of Samuel in the Holy Tanakh. The chosen stories in these chapters enlighten us on the importance of obeying God’s commandments, as a key to a life of righteousness and goodness. “And Samuel said to Saul, ‘The Lord sent me to anoint you to be king over His people, over Israel…’ The word of the Lord came to Samuel, saying, ‘I regret that I have made Saul king, for he has turned back from following Me, and he has not fulfilled My words.’” “‘Has the Lord (as much) desire in burnt offerings and peace-offerings, as in obeying the voice of the Lord? Behold, to obey is better than an offering; to hearken (is better) than the fat of rams. For rebellion is as the sin of divination, and stubbornness is as idolatry and teraphim. Since you rejected the word of the Lord, He has rejected you from being a king.’ “And Saul said to Samuel, ‘I have sinned, for I transgressed the Lord’s command, and your words, for I feared the people, and I hearkened to their voice. And now, forgive now my sin, and return with me, and I shall prostrate myself to the Lord.’” “And Samuel said to Saul, ‘I shall not return with you, for you have rejected the word of the Lord, and the Lord has rejected you from being a king over Israel.’” “And the Lord said to Samuel, ‘Look not upon his appearance, or the height of his stature, for I have rejected him, for it is not as man sees, (what is visible) to the eyes, while the Lord sees into the heart.’”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-07-27   230 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-07-27

Aspects of the Spiritual Life: Thoughts in Solitude by the Reverend Thomas Merton (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

00:15:26

Aspects of the Spiritual Life: Thoughts in Solitude by the Reverend Thomas Merton (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

The Reverend Thomas Merton, an important Catholic mystic and spiritual thinker, was born in 1915, to a New Zealand father and an American mother. The many life situations he encountered in his youth led him to explore religion and spirituality and eventually devote his life to God by becoming a monk, and later a deacon, at the Abbey of Gethsemani, a part of the Order of Trappists, in Kentucky, USA. Today, we will tap in to the Reverend Merton’s deep thoughts, as expressed in his book entitled, “Thoughts in Solitude,” where he elaborates on aspects of our lives related to the greater spiritual reality, and how that co-dependence can be of a benefit to us. “The death by which we enter into life is not an escape from reality but a complete gift of ourselves which involves a total commitment to reality. It begins by renouncing the illusory reality which created things acquire when they are seen only in their relation to our own selfish interests.” “We begin our renouncement of creatures by standing back from them and looking at them as they are in themselves. In so doing we penetrate their reality, their actuality, their truth, which cannot be discovered until we get them outside ourselves and stand back so that they are seen in perspective. We cannot see things in perspective until we cease to hug them to our own bosom. When we let go of them, we begin to appreciate them as they really are. Only then can we begin to see God in them. Not until we find Him in them, can we start on the road of dark contemplation at whose end we shall be able to find them in Him.” “The Desert Fathers (early Christian hermits who lived in the desert) believed that the wilderness had been created as supremely valuable in the eyes of God precisely because it had no value to men. The wasteland was the land that could never be wasted by men because it offered them nothing. There was nothing to attract them. There was nothing to exploit. The desert was the region in which the Chosen People had wandered for forty years, cared for by God alone. They could have reached the Promised Land in a few months if they had travelled directly to it. God’s plan was that they should learn to love Him in the wilderness and that they should always look back upon the time in the desert as the idyllic time of their life with Him alone.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-04   230 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-04

Selections from "The Pathway of Life" by Leo Tolstoy (vegetarian): Volume 1, Faith, Part 1 of 2

00:14:35

Selections from "The Pathway of Life" by Leo Tolstoy (vegetarian): Volume 1, Faith, Part 1 of 2

However, yearning for more than success, fame, and wealth, Leo Tolstoy eventually established himself as a moral philosopher and spiritual leader during the last 30 years of his life. In addition to adopting and promoting the vegetarian diet, he became a fervent Christian pacifist through an interpretation of the ethical teachings of Christ. We would like to share an insightful excerpt from Volume 1 of “The Pathway of Life,” a collection of Tolstoy’s philosophies on religion, life, death and more. Faith “In order to live right, it is needful to understand what life is, as well as what to do and what not to do in this life. These things have been taught at all times by the wisest and best living men of all races. The teachings of all these wise men, in the main, agree as one. This one doctrine common to all people as to what is the life of man, and how to live it, is the true faith.” “The Doctrine of True Faith is Always Clear and Simple ‘To have faith is to trust in what is being revealed to us, without asking why it is so, and what will come out of it. Such is the true faith.’” “If I have faith in God, I need not ask what will be the outcome of my obedience to God, because I know that God is love, and nothing can come from love but what is good.” “The law of life asks nothing of us but to love our neighbor. And to love is not difficult, but pleasant. When a man comes to know the true faith, he is like unto a man lighting a lamp in a dark chamber. All things become clear, and joy enters his soul.” “‘Love one another, even as I have loved you, thus shall all men know that you are My disciples, if you have love one for another,’ said Christ.” “Faith with different people, and in different times, may differ, but love is one and the same at all times and with all people. The true faith is one to love all that is living. Love bestows blessedness on people because it unites man with God.” “The life of man is good or evil only as he understands the true law of life. The more clearly man understands the true law of life, the better is his life; the more hazy is his understanding of that law, the worse is his life.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-12   227 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-12

Selections from "The Pathway of Life" by Leo Tolstoy (vegetarian): Volume 1, Faith, Part 2 of 2

00:13:54

Selections from "The Pathway of Life" by Leo Tolstoy (vegetarian): Volume 1, Faith, Part 2 of 2

“The law of life, namely to love God and your neighbor, is simple and clear. Every man on attaining reason recognizes it in his heart. Therefore, if it were not for false teachings, all men would adhere to this law, and the Kingdom of Heaven would reign upon earth. But false teachers, at all times and in all places, taught men to acknowledge as God that which was not God, and as God's law that which was not God's law. And men believed in these false teachings and departed from the true law of life and from the fulfilment of His true law, and this made their life harder to bear and more unhappy. Therefore one must not believe any teachings that do not agree with love of God and of your neighbor. It must not be thought that because a faith is ancient, it is therefore true. On the contrary, the longer people live, the more clearly they grasp the true law of life. We are perturbed because we can no longer believe in that in which our fathers used to believe. We must not let this perturb us, but try instead to establish within us such a faith in which we can believe as firmly as our fathers believed in their faith.”“Thus it is with people who do not listen to the voice of the spirit within themselves, but listen to the voice of strangers regarding God and His law. It is bad not to know God, but it is worse to acknowledge as God that which is not God.” “True faith is to believe in that one law which befits all the people in the world. True faith enters the heart in stillness and solitude only. True faith consists in living always a good life, loving all men, doing unto others as you would have others do unto you. This, indeed, is the true faith. And this is the faith that all truly wise men and men of saintly life have always taught among all nations.” “The time will come, nay, has already come, when men will worship the Father neither in Gerizim nor yet in Jerusalem, but true worshippers will worship the Father in spirit and in the truth, for such are the worshippers whom the Father seeks.” “All God requires of us is good works. Therein is the entire law of God.”
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2020-06-13   226 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-13

Selections from “Pioneers of the Soul” by Hilda Charlton (vegetarian): Chapter 2 – The Real You, Part 1 of 2

00:09:18

Selections from “Pioneers of the Soul” by Hilda Charlton (vegetarian): Chapter 2 – The Real You, Part 1 of 2

Hilda Charlton’s early life was spent in the United Kingdom and the United States. As a young adult, Hilda began performing professionally as a classical and sacred dancer. She said that performances such as the “Dance of Angkor Wat” were intended to help awaken the Divine in others. In response to a yearning for her own deeper connection with God, Hilda Charlton traveled to India where she meditated and studied with Masters such as Bhagavan Nityananda and Jagadguru Sathya Sai Baba. “Pioneers of the Soul” is a collection of Hilda Charlton’s lectures delivered in New York City at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Their topics included upcoming changes on our planet, the power of the Divine, tips for spiritual development, and more. We now share with you an excerpt from “Chapter Two – The Real You” in “Pioneers of the Soul.” “‘Hurt not the Earth, neither the sea, nor the trees, till we have sealed the servants of our God in their foreheads.’” “That’s what it says in Genesis. The world is better than good. It is only people that are the trouble, so let’s change the world back to what God intended by changing our little bit — ourselves. We are responsible for our little bit. That is your duty in this life; that is why you came down at this very, very special time, as the changes lead into the millennium.” “How can I awaken you deep inside to the fact that within a mere twelve or thirteen years, not one item on the Earth will be the same — not education, not economics, not medicine, nothing will be the same, nothing in the world. I plead with you, let us start the new life expected of us right now — a life of unconditional love and trust.” “Everyone who takes Their teachings seriously — and I repeat this in the name of Count Saint Germaine and Master Hilarion — everyone who takes Their teachings seriously is being watched and helped by them in these hard times. Beloveds, you can’t beat this game down here. You can’t beat it your own way, particularly at this time, because God has written a script and is now having auditions for those who are to play the parts. So start practicing and rehearsing your parts and be adept at God’s way of acting out life.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-07-31   226 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-07-31

Jesus Christ - The Same Yesterday, Today, And Forever: Sermon by Jonathan Edwards, Part 1 of 2

00:15:10

Jesus Christ - The Same Yesterday, Today, And Forever: Sermon by Jonathan Edwards, Part 1 of 2

Jonathan Edwards was an acknowledged American philosophical theologian, born in 1703, into the family of notable Congregational ministers, in Connecticut. Jonathan Edwards wrote sermons and theological treatises that emphasized the absolute sovereignty, as well as the beauty and holiness of God. He contemplated on the divine virtues as an imitation of the loveliness and benevolence of the Creator. Today, we will read a selection from Jonathan Edwards’ sermon entitled, “Jesus Christ - The Same Yesterday, Today, And Forever.” “When it is said that Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever, by yesterday is meant all time past; by today, the time present; and by forever, all that is future, from the present time to eternity. Doctrine: Jesus Christ is the same now that He ever has been and ever will be. Christ is thus unchangeable in two respects.” “I. In His divine nature. As Christ is one of the persons of the Trinity, He is God, and so has the divine nature, or the Godhead dwelling in Him, and all the divine attributes belong to Him, of which immutability or unchangeableness is one. Christ, in His human nature was not absolutely unchangeable, though His human nature, by reason of its union with the divine, was not liable to those changes to which it was liable, as a mere creature.” “II. Christ is unchangeable in His office. He is unchangeable as the Mediator and Savior. That unchangeableness of Christ in His office of Mediator, appears in several things. ‘First, He is an everlasting Savior. There have been typical mediators, many that have continued but a little while, and then have passed away, and others have come in their room. There have been prophets, that have been raised up, and these have died, and others have succeeded them.’” “But Christ’s ministry never ceases. ‘Christ is a minister of the true tabernacle and the true sanctuary, which the Lord has built, and not man.’ ‘Second, Christ is at all times equally sufficient for the office He has undertaken. He undertook the office from eternity, and He was sufficient for it from eternity.’ ‘Third, He is now, and ever will be, the same that He ever has been in the disposition and will, which He exercises in His office.’”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-09   226 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-09

From the Secret Doctrine: Cosmogenesis - The Seven Creations, Part 1 of 2

00:14:03

From the Secret Doctrine: Cosmogenesis - The Seven Creations, Part 1 of 2

The 19th-century Russian esotericist Helena Petrovna von Hahn, more popularly known as Madame Blavatsky or H.P.B., came from a noble family in Ukraine. As a child, Madame Blavatsky would often have visions and displayed clairvoyance as well as other metaphysical phenomena. Years later, she traveled throughout Europe and the Middle East studying under various teachers and Sufi saints. While in London, United Kingdom, she met one special teacher, an Indian yogi named Master Morya, who later directed her to go to New York in the United States. Once there, she founded the Theosophical Society in 1875 with other like-minded individuals. Madame Blavatsky wrote several important books on Theosophy, including “Isis Unveiled,” “The Secret Doctrine,” “The Key to Theosophy,” and “The Voice of the Silence.” “The Secret Doctrine” explains the origin and evolution of the universe and of humanity through an account of "Root Races" dating back millions of years. Although the writer of “The Secret Doctrine,” Madame Blavatsky often expressed that she was only the compiler of ancient wisdom that was passed on to her. The true authors of the work were her teachers, the Mahatmas, or Great Souls, who were the guardians of the Secret Wisdom of the ages. We will now share with you “From the Secret Doctrine: Cosmogenesis – The Seven Creations.”“The Seven Creations are found in almost every Purana. They are all preceded by what Wilson translates as the ‘Indiscrete Principle,’ Absolute Spirit, independent of any relation with objects of sense. They are: (1) Mahattattva, the Universal Soul, Infinite Intellect, or Divine Mind; (2) Tanmâtras, Bhûta or Bhûtasarga, Elemental Creation the first differentiation of Universal Indiscrete Substance; (3) Indriya or Aindriyaka, Organic Evolution. ‘These three were the Prâkrita Creations, the developments of indiscrete nature, preceded by the Indiscrete Principle’; (4) Mukhya, ‘the Fundamental Creation (of perceptible things) was that of inanimate bodies’; (5) Tairyagyonya or Tiryaksrotas, was that of animals; (6) Ûrdhvasrotas, or that of divinities; (7) Arvâksrotas, was that of man. This is the order given in the exoteric texts. According to esoteric teaching, there are seven Primary, and seven Secondary ‘Creations’; the former being the Forces self-evolving from the one causeless Force; the latter showing the manifested Universe emanating from the already differentiated divine Elements.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-12-30   226 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-12-30
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