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From the Gnostic Nag Hammadi Library: Excerpts from The Gospel of Truth, Part 2 of 2

00:13:23

From the Gnostic Nag Hammadi Library: Excerpts from The Gospel of Truth, Part 2 of 2

Today, we continue reading from the excerpts of the Gospel of Truth, part of the Nag Hammadi Library. The scripture inspires us with the indescribable security, love and sense of belonging that one’s soul experiences being in a perfect union with one’s Creator, and resting in the Truth. “‘He [Christ] is good. He knows His plantings, because it is He who planted them in His Paradise. Now His Paradise is His place of rest.’ This is the perfection in the thought of the Father, and these are the words of His meditation. Each one of His words is the work of His one will in the revelation of His Word. While they were still depths of His thought, the Word, which was first to come forth, revealed them, along with a mind that speaks the one Word in silent grace. He was called ‘thought,’ since they were in it before being revealed. It came about, then, that He was first to come forth, at the time when the will of Him who willed desired it. And the Will is what the Father rests in, and is pleased with. Nothing happens without Him, nor does anything happen without the will of the Father, but His will is unsearchable.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-05-07   244 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-05-07

On Serenity and Insight: Selections from “The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 3,” Part 1 of 2

00:12:32

On Serenity and Insight: Selections from “The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 3,” Part 1 of 2

Tsongkhapa Lobsang Drakpa was also known by the honorific title Je Rinpoche. Tsongkhapa, whose birth and spiritual connection with the Manjushri Bodhisattva was foretold by the Shakyamuni Buddha, entered monastic life at age seven and was given the ordained name Lobsang Drakpa. Even after attaining the merits of the highest realization and perfect understanding, Tsongkhapa Lobsang Drakpa remained a humble enlightened Master. He REFRAINED FROM THE USE OF MIRACLE POWERS and instead shared His insights about pure moral conduct being the basis for successful spiritual training and development. Along with founding the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism, Tsongkhapa Lobsang Drakpa also wrote several books, including “The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment,” which highlights a unified message from all Buddhist teachings as well as explaining how to put them into practice. Now we are going to present selections from Volume 3 of “The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment.” “The concentration that you will accomplish here has two special features: vivid intensity — an intense mental clarity — and non-discursive stability, staying one-pointedly on the object of meditation...” “Since the development of this sort of vivid intensity is blocked as long as there is laxity, while one-pointed non-discursiveness is blocked as long as there is excitement, laxity and excitement are the chief obstacles to achieving genuine concentration. So if you do not understand how to identify accurately the subtle and coarse forms of laxity and excitement, or if you do not know how to correctly sustain a concentration which stops these once you have identified them, then it will be impossible for you to develop serenity, not to mention insight. Hence, those who diligently seek concentration should master these techniques...Here, concentration refers to your attention remaining one-pointedly on an object of meditation; in addition, it must stay with the object continuously. Two things are needed for this: a technique in which your attention is not distracted from whatever it had as its original object of meditation, and an accurate awareness of whether you are distracted and whether you are becoming distracted. The former is mindfulness; the latter is vigilance. Vasubandhu's Commentary on the ‘Ornament for the Mahayana Sutras’ states: Mindfulness and vigilance bring about close mental focus because the former prevents your attention from wandering from the object of meditation and the latter clearly recognizes that your attention is wandering. If a lapse in mindfulness leads to forgetting the object of meditation, you will be distracted and will immediately lose the object upon which you are meditating. Therefore, the foundation of cultivating concentration is mindfulness which does not forget the object.” “It is said that you achieve concentration on the basis of mindfulness and that mindfulness is like a rope that actually fastens your attention to the object of meditation continuously, so mindfulness is the main technique to sustain in achieving concentration.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-14   243 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-14

From The Cloud upon the Sanctuary by Karl von Eckartshausen – Selection from Letter I, Part 2 of 3

00:12:14

From The Cloud upon the Sanctuary by Karl von Eckartshausen – Selection from Letter I, Part 2 of 3

We now continue reading the second selected part of Letter Ⅰ, from Karl von Eckartshausen’s book “The Cloud upon the Sanctuary.” The author expands more on some basic spiritual principles and the real Source of Truth and Union with the Divine. “The opening of this spiritual sensorium is the mystery of the New Man – the mystery of Regeneration, and of the vital union between God and man – it is the noblest object of religion on Earth, that religion whose sublime goal is none other than to unite men with God in Spirit and in Truth. As man has internally a spiritual organ and a sensorium to receive the true principle of Divine wisdom, or a true motive for the will or Divine love, he has also exteriorly a physical and material sensorium to receive the appearance of light and truth. As external nature can have no absolute truth, but only phenomenally relative, therefore, human reason cannot cognize pure truth, it can but apprehend through the appearance of phenomena, which excites the lust of the eye, and in this as a source of action consists the corruption of sensuous man and the degradation of nature.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-03-13   241 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-03-13

Spiritual Laws – Selection from an Essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson (vegetarian)

00:16:33

Spiritual Laws – Selection from an Essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson (vegetarian)

Ralph Waldo Emerson was a renowned 19th-century American essayist, philosopher, lecturer, poet, and a leader of the transcendental philosophical movement. His literature influenced many other celebrated writers, including Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman. Emerson is most famous for his essays, through which he expresses ideas of freedom, spirituality, individuality, the great ability of humans to realize almost everything, and the relationship between the soul and the surrounding world. Ralph Waldo Emerson traveled widely giving lectures and became well known for his publications “Essays” and “Nature.” Today, we will invigorate our minds and spirits with an excerpt from one of Mr. Emerson’s perceptive essays entitled, “Spiritual Laws.” “The simplicity of the universe is very different from the simplicity of a machine. The simplicity of nature is not that which may easily be read, but is inexhaustible. The last analysis can no wise be made. We judge of a man’s wisdom by his hope, knowing that the perception of the inexhaustibleness of nature is an immortal youth. The wild fertility of nature is felt in comparing our rigid names and reputations with our fluid consciousness.” “A little consideration of what takes place around us every day would show us, that a higher law than that of our will regulates events; that our painful labors are unnecessary, and fruitless; that only in our easy, simple, spontaneous action are we strong, and by contenting ourselves with obedience, we become divine. Belief and love, — a believing love will relieve us of a vast load of care. O my brothers, God exists. There is a soul at the center of nature, and over the will of every man, so that none of us can wrong the universe. It has so infused its strong enchantment into nature, that we prosper when we accept its advice, and when we struggle to wound its creatures, our hands are glued to our sides, or they beat our own breasts. The whole course of things goes to teach us faith. We need only obey. There is guidance for each of us, and by lowly listening, we shall hear the right word. Why need you choose so painfully your place, and occupation, and associates, and modes of action, and of entertainment?”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-19   241 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-19

Probation on the Path of Discipleship – by Dr. Rudolf Steiner (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

00:13:13

Probation on the Path of Discipleship – by Dr. Rudolf Steiner (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

Born in 1861, Dr. Rudolf Steiner was a great Austrian polymath, philosopher and scientist who made influential contributions in the fields of education, science, spirituality and medicine. He is perhaps best known for pioneering the holistic educational methods for the Waldorf schools. An eloquent public speaker and gifted writer, he gave over 6,000 lectures in his lifetime and gained recognition as a literary critic. His writings cover a wide range of subjects, and he published more than 25 books, including “Mysticism at the Dawn of the Modern Age,” “The Way of Initiation,” and “Intuitive Thinking as a Spiritual Path: The Philosophy of Freedom.” He developed and taught an esoteric spiritual philosophy called anthroposophy, based on “the science of the spirit.” Today, we will read a passage from the chapter “Path of Discipleship,” in Dr. Rudolf Steiner’s book, “The Way of Initiation.” “This calm contemplation must become a necessity to the student. He is plunged completely into a world of thought, and must develop an earnest desire for calm thinking. He must learn to love the in-pouring of the spirit. Then he will learn to regard this thought-world and its thought-forms as more real than the every-day things which surround him, and he begins to deal with thoughts as with things existing in space.” “He begins to hear voices through the silence. Formerly his ear was the only organ of hearing; now he can listen with his soul. An inner language and an inner voice are revealed to him. It is a moment of supremest ecstasy to the student when this experience first comes to him. An inner light floods the whole external world for him, and he is ‘born anew.’ Through his being passes a current from a divine world, bringing with it divine bliss.” “Those who, by means of meditation, rise to that which unites man with spirit, are bringing to life within them the eternal element which is not limited by birth nor death. Only those who have had no experience for themselves can doubt the existence of this eternal element. Thus, meditation becomes the way by which man also attains to the recognition and contemplation of his eternal, indestructible, essential being. And only through meditation can one attain to such a view of life. Gnosis and Theosophy tell of the eternal nature of this essential being, and of its reincarnation. The question is often asked: ‘Why does a man know nothing of those experiences which lie beyond the borders of birth and death?’ Not thus should we ask, but rather: ‘How may we attain to such knowledge?’ The entrance to the Path is opened by right meditation. This alone can revive the memory of events that lie beyond the borders of birth and death.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-17   240 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-17

Excerpts from “A Conversation Among Five Travelers Concerning Life’s True Happiness” by Hryhorii Skovoroda (vegetarian)

00:13:24

Excerpts from “A Conversation Among Five Travelers Concerning Life’s True Happiness” by Hryhorii Skovoroda (vegetarian)

Hryhorii Skovoroda, was an 18th century philosopher, poet, and composer of religious music. A number of his songs can be found in his writings, and several of them have been adapted to Ukrainian folk music. Skovoroda’s work contributed to the culture of both Russia and Ukraine. He is considered to be one of the key philosophical figures during the transition from the Middle Ages to the modern time. His work also revealed a deep belief in Godliness and a life of spiritual rather than material value. Skovoroda’s writings are in Socratic dialog form and are genuinely imaginative, witty, dramatic, and always have a theme that highlights happiness and appreciation of life. He has been called a “Socrates” both as a moralist and one whose work is intended to stimulate thought and self-introspection. We now share with you excerpts from his writings on “A Conversation Among Five Travelers Concerning Life’s True Happiness.” Wisdom: “Wisdom is like the sharp and far-seeing eye of the eagle, and virtue is like manly arms joined to the nimble legs of a deer. This divine union is vividly depicted in the following fable.” “‘That is not the end of the matter,’ said the blind man, ‘you are a light and precious burden to me: I shall carry you, my treasure, on my back. Let your clear eyes be the eternal masters of my body and a head to all my members. Put an end to the torment of this primordial darkness that hounds me inhumanly along the empty path of the body’s distractions. I am your steed; mount upon my shoulders and guide me, dearest brother and master.’ ‘I shall mount up willingly, my brother, in order to show the truth of the word of God written by the author of Proverbs: ‘Brother helped by brother is like a firm and tall city, strong like a well-founded kingdom.’” Nature and Happiness: “Nature, our most merciful Mother and the Father of all our pleasures, has opened the path to happiness to all creatures that breathe without exception. But the trouble is that we do not try to find out precisely where happiness lies. We grab and clutch what merely presents an attractive appearance as though it were a firm foundation. Lack of counsel is the source of our unhappiness. It makes us prisoners, representing the bitter as sweet and the sweet as bitter.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-08   236 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-08

True Monk: Selections from Jainism's Holy Sutrakritanga Sutra, Book II, Lecture 1 – The Lotus, Part 2 of 2

00:12:06

True Monk: Selections from Jainism's Holy Sutrakritanga Sutra, Book II, Lecture 1 – The Lotus, Part 2 of 2

“A monk who does not act, nor kill, who is free from wrath, pride, deceit, and greed, who is calm and happy, should not entertain the following wish: May I, after my departure from this world, by dint of my intellect, knowledge, memory, learning, or of the performance of austerities, religious duties, chastity, or of this habit to eat no more than is necessary to sustain life, become a god at whose command are all objects of pleasure, or a perfected saint who is exempt from pain and misery. (Through his austerities) he may obtain his object, or he may not obtain it. A monk should not be infatuated with sounds, colors, smells, tastes, and feelings of touch; he should abstain from wrath, pride, deceit, and greed, from love, hate, quarrel, calumny, reviling of others, aversion to control and delight in sensual things, deceit and untruth, and the sin of wrong belief. In this way a monk ceases to acquire gross karma, controls himself, and abstains from sins. He does not kill movable or immovable beings, nor has them killed by another person, nor does he consent to another’s killing them. In this way a monk ceases to acquire gross karma, controls himself, and abstains from sins. He does not acquire sentient or senseless objects of pleasure, nor has them acquired by another person, nor does he consent to another’s acquiring them.” “A monk who knows the proper measure in all things travelling in one direction or other, should teach, explain, and praise the Law (spiritual precepts), preach it unto those who exert themselves well, and to those who do not, to all who come to listen. He should preach to them indifference for the peace of mind, cessation of passion, Nirvana, purity, simplicity, humility, freedom from bonds. He should preach the Law which prohibits to kill any living being, after having well considered it. When a monk preaches the Law (spiritual precepts), he should preach it not for the sake of food, drink, clothes, resting-place, or lodging, nor for any objects of pleasure; but he should preach the Law indefatigably, for no other motive than the annihilation of karma. Those heroes of faith who are instructed in the Law (spiritual precepts), by such a monk and exert themselves well, are possessed of all virtues, abstain from all sins, cease from all passions, conduct themselves well in every way, and reach final beatitude.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-11-21   235 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-11-21

Selections from Collected Poems by Sri Aurobindo: Poems from Ahana and Other Poems, Part 1 of 2

00:09:05

Selections from Collected Poems by Sri Aurobindo: Poems from Ahana and Other Poems, Part 1 of 2

India – the home of many great spiritual Masters who have brought wisdom and truth to Earth, inspiring us to seek higher purposes in life, thus uplifting humanity to a divine state of living. One such great being is the spiritual master, yogi, philosopher, poet and politician Sri Aurobindo, who graced our planet from 1872 to 1950. “Collected Poems” is the Volume 2 of the Complete Works of Sri Aurobindo, which includes all short and narrative poems in English that Sri Aurobindo published during his lifetime. “It beheld the stars Born from a thought and knew how being prepares. Then I remembered how I woke from sleep And made the skies, built earth, formed Ocean deep.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-10-31   234 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-10-31

Love of Existence and Knowledge: From “The City of God” by Saint Augustine of Hippo (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

00:11:50

Love of Existence and Knowledge: From “The City of God” by Saint Augustine of Hippo (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

Saint Augustine of Hippo was an esteemed late 4th and early 5th century Christian bishop in present-day Algeria. He became Bishop of Hippo, an ancient seaport city, in his early 40s, and remained in the position for the rest of his life. Known as one of the greatest Christian philosophers, St. Augustine was a prolific writer, with about 100 books, 300 letters and 500 sermons still preserved. His work covers subjects including theology, philosophy and sociology and has had a lasting influence on the Christian world. Among his most significant writings are “The City of God,” “De Doctrina Christiana” and “Confessions.” The respected bishop was also a compassionate vegetarian, and drew attention to the lifestyle of those who “not only abstain from flesh and wine, but also from other viands. … which flatter taste.” Today, we will open Saint Augustine’s book “The City of God,” to read a selection of insights on the universal gift of existence, which by itself gives us an awareness, which no living creature would trade for anything else. “And truly the very fact of existing is by some natural spell so pleasant, that even the wretched are, for no other reason, unwilling to perish; and, when they feel that they are wretched, wish not that they themselves be annihilated, but that their misery be so.” “The well-known feeling of such men witnesses to this. For when we see that they fear to die, and will rather live in such misfortune than end it by death, is it not obvious enough how nature shrinks from annihilation?” “And how much human nature loves the knowledge of its existence, and how it shrinks from being deceived, will be sufficiently understood from this fact, that every man prefers to grieve in a sane mind, rather than to be glad in madness. And this grand and wonderful instinct belongs to men alone of all animals; for, though some of them have keener eyesight than ourselves for this world’s light, they cannot attain to that spiritual Light with which our mind is somehow irradiated, so that we can form right judgments of all things. For our power to judge is proportioned to our acceptance of this Light…”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-16   232 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-16

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 2 of 2

00:10:16

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 2 of 2

We now present “Song of Love” from the book The Songs of Twilight by Victor Hugo. “If there be a velvet grassy expanse By dewdrops pearly dressed, Where through all seasons Flowers by bees care, Where one may gather, Roses, honeysuckle, lily white, I gladly would make of it a site For thy foot to rest. If there be a loving heart Where Honor rules the breast, Loyal and true in every part, That changes never molest, Eager to run its noble race, Intend to do some work of grace, I gladly would make of it a place For thy brow to rest. And if there be of love a dream Which shows, – A something sweet and blessed, – A dream that mingles, I gladly of it would make the goal Where thy mind should rest.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-12   231 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-12

Selections from Jagatguru Adi Shankaracharya’s Hymns – "Shivananda Lahari," Part 1 of 2

00:12:53

Selections from Jagatguru Adi Shankaracharya’s Hymns – "Shivananda Lahari," Part 1 of 2

Born in 8th Century India, Jagatguru Adi Shankaracharya showed an early interest in spiritual life. By age eight, He had read and understood all of the Vedic scriptures. After receiving permission to leave home in pursuit of spiritual attainment, He met and received instruction from Guru Govinda Bhagavatpada. Shankaracharya went on to write commentaries on the ancient doctrine, “Advaita Vedanta” as well as the “Bhagavad Gita” and the ten principal Upanishads. He became known as the founder of the Smartha tradition, which brought together several branches of the Hindu faith and highlights the oneness of the inner Self (Atman) with the Supreme God (Nirguna Brahman). Shankaracharya also composed 72 hymns of praise and reverence for the Divine, dedicated to Lord Krishna and Lord Shiva. “Shivananda Lahari,” or “Waves of the Bliss of Shiva,” is one of the devotional hymns composed by Adi Shankaracharya. “Oh Lord Shambu, who grants us happiness, Let these waves of ecstasy of Lord Shiva, Flowing from the holy history of yours, Calming the dusts of sin forever, Rushing from the canals of wisdom, Falling into the whirlpool of life, Dousing the fires of sorrow, Living in my heart as senses, Be always victorious. I pray with all my heart, Him who is known by the three Vedas, Him who is pleasant to the mind, Him who is first among everything, Him who has all seeing three eyes, Him who carries the weight of matted lock, With eminence great, Him who wears the moving snake as necklace, Him who holds the jumping deer in his hand, Him who is greatest among devas, Him who shines with glitter, Him who has mercy on me, Him who is the Lord of all beings, Him who is the only support to holy wisdom, Him who is always with my Goddess, And Him who is a great entertainer.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-01   227 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-01

Self and Soul: From The Sanctuary of Self - Rosicrucian Order Library, Part 1 of 2

00:15:34

Self and Soul: From The Sanctuary of Self - Rosicrucian Order Library, Part 1 of 2

The Ancient Mystical Order Rosae Crucis, also known as the Rosicrucian Order, AMORC, is a worldwide cultural, educational, and philosophical organization that is perpetuating the profound and practical teachings of the Rosicrucians. These teachings, as passed down and added to over the centuries, from ancient Egypt to Europe and now all over the world, pertain to the mysteries of the universe, nature, and humans themselves. Today, we will read from chapter III, “Self and Soul,” from Part One entitled, “The Mysteries,” in Frater Ralph M. Lewis’s book, “The Sanctuary of Self.” A detailed and comprehensive explanation is offered in this chapter, on the nature of consciousness and human’s awareness. “It is commonly said that we feel self, but such is a verisimilitude (the appearance of truth). The fact is that the sensations of self are not like those we derive from the touch of an object. To self, there are no sensations of hot, cold, hard, or soft, nor are there sensations of pain or pleasure. You realize that you are you, quite aside from such experiences. This consciousness of self, then, is a consciousness of our consciousness.” “The consciousness has thresholds. By thresholds, we mean the points at which certain effects or sensations begin to occur in the brain. The thresholds for the impulses of sound and sight, for example, are considerably lower than those of the vague impressions of self. Consequently, it is comparatively easy to lose a realization of self, if the grosser impulses of the sense organs dominate the consciousness of the brain. In other words, if the consciousness is exposed to a bombardment of sounds and an excitation of visual impressions, we know from our own experience that we lose momentarily, a realization of self in these physical perceptions of the objective consciousness. Only when the thresholds of the receptor senses are partially blocked or suppressed, do we become fully aware of those more subtle impressions, which reach the higher thresholds of the brain consciousness, and which we experience as self.” “The activities of self, the realities of our inner being, are more complex in this sense than are those particulars of the material or everyday world which we experience. If, for analogy, the Cosmic order or God, whichever you please, is the synthesis of everything, then that God obviously is complex — infinite in substance and in variety. If we become conscious of the complex, or the greater evolvements or manifestations of His nature, the closer is our intimacy with Him, the more of Him we experience.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-12   227 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-10-12

Obedience and Righteousness before the Lord: Selection from the Holy Tanakh’s Book of Samuel, Part 1 of 2

00:16:09

Obedience and Righteousness before the Lord: Selection from the Holy Tanakh’s Book of Samuel, Part 1 of 2

Judaism’s history begins around 2000 BCE with the Covenant between God (Elohim) and Abraham. Over a thousand years later, as the Jewish faithful Believe, God's (Elohim’s) laws and commandments were revealed to Prophet Moses on Mount Sinai, forming the Torah, which is the first part of the Hebrew Bible. The Hebrew Bible, or Tanakh, and the ancient writings of the Talmud, embody the beliefs and practices of Judaism. Present in every aspect of the religion is a single, omniscient, and compassionate God (Elohim). The Holy Tanakh’s Book of Samuel is the third book in the Neviim (Prophets), and the second section of the Holy Tanakh. Filled with succinct messages through the depicted stories, the Book of Samuel is dedicated to giving the right directions for those who seek their way to God. Today, we will read excerpts from Chapters 15, 16 and 18 from the Book of Samuel in the Holy Tanakh. The chosen stories in these chapters enlighten us on the importance of obeying God’s commandments, as a key to a life of righteousness and goodness. “And Samuel said to Saul, ‘The Lord sent me to anoint you to be king over His people, over Israel…’ The word of the Lord came to Samuel, saying, ‘I regret that I have made Saul king, for he has turned back from following Me, and he has not fulfilled My words.’” “‘Has the Lord (as much) desire in burnt offerings and peace-offerings, as in obeying the voice of the Lord? Behold, to obey is better than an offering; to hearken (is better) than the fat of rams. For rebellion is as the sin of divination, and stubbornness is as idolatry and teraphim. Since you rejected the word of the Lord, He has rejected you from being a king.’ “And Saul said to Samuel, ‘I have sinned, for I transgressed the Lord’s command, and your words, for I feared the people, and I hearkened to their voice. And now, forgive now my sin, and return with me, and I shall prostrate myself to the Lord.’” “And Samuel said to Saul, ‘I shall not return with you, for you have rejected the word of the Lord, and the Lord has rejected you from being a king over Israel.’” “And the Lord said to Samuel, ‘Look not upon his appearance, or the height of his stature, for I have rejected him, for it is not as man sees, (what is visible) to the eyes, while the Lord sees into the heart.’”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-07-27   224 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-07-27

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 1 of 2

00:12:02

Selected Spiritual Poems by Victor Hugo, Part 1 of 2

Internationally, Victor Hugo is best known for his popular novels like “Notre-Dame de Paris” (“The Hunchback of Notre-Dame”) and “Les Misérables,” which have also inspired famous movies and musicals. But especially in his native France, Victor Hugo is also regarded as one of the greatest poets. Above all, Hugo's words have the power to move the common person's soul. Today we would like to share with you spiritual poems by Victor Hugo. "When my mind, on the ocean of poetry hurled, Floats on in repose round this wonderful world, Oft the sacred fire from heaven - Mysterious sun, that gives light to the soul – Strikes mine with its ray."
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-11   222 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2019-11-11

Selection from The Sutra of Complete Enlightenment: Chapters 1-2, Part 2 of 2

00:12:54

Selection from The Sutra of Complete Enlightenment: Chapters 1-2, Part 2 of 2

“‘Virtuous man, the multifarious phantasmal transformations of all the multibeings are generated from the wondrous mind of their thus-adventistic consummate enlightenment. It can be compared to the ethereal blossoms, which come into being, as it were, out of the space; and when the phantasmal blossoms vanish, the essence of the space would not go into deterioration along with the blossoms. Thus, the phantasmal minds of multibeings are to terminate along with the phantasmata; yet when all phantasmata die away, the enlightened mind would still remain impregnable. Nevertheless, when this enlightenment is maintained as an opposition to phantasm, such enlightenment would still be reduced to a sort of phantasm. If one professes that there is enlightenment, it would only evince that one has not yet been entirely detached from phantasm. On the other hand, if someone pronounces that there is no enlightenment, he would be entangled in the same phantasmal state as the former person. Consequently, only when all phantasmata have come to expiration, could it be deemed as the state of impregnability.’” “‘Virtuous man, all Bodhisattvas and latter-age multibeings must perforce depart from the phantasmal transformations, and all spurious delusive phenomena. If one is able to persist steadfastly in one’s intent for renunciation, in the meantime it behooves one to be aware that such an intent is also phantasmal; hence it should also be renounced.’” “‘Virtuous man, true awareness of the phantasmata shall enable one to depart from them forthwith; hence no other dexterous means need to be implemented for it. And on one’s departure from phantasmata, straightway would one become enlightened; hence, no gradual approaches would ever be in need, either. If only all Bodhisattvas and latter-age multibeings could cultivate in compliance with this means, they would be able to detach themselves from all phantasmata perpetually.’ At that juncture, the World-Venerated One, wishing to reiterate this import, divulged this Gatha: ‘Samantabhadra, it behooves thee to comprehend That ever since time immemorial, The phantasmal inanity of all the multibeings Has been constituted out of their consummate enlightenment, Which is akin to that of all the thus-adventists. This could be likened to the ethereal blossoms, Which rely on the space for manifesting their appearances. However, when the ethereal blossoms vanish, The ethereal space still remains unmoved as ever. All phantasmata arise from perceptions, And when these phantasmata expire The perceptivity is to stay as consummate as ever, For the perceptive mind is perpetually unchangeable. If only all the Bodhisattvas and latter-age multibeings Could constantly be detached from all phantasmata, And when all phantasms are renounced, It would be like igniting fire in a block of wood: When the wood is incinerated, the fire would also expire. As enlightenment per se is beyond graduality, So would it be the same with dexterous means.’”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-17   221 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-17

Selections of Mystic Verses of Tulsi Sahib (vegetarian), Saint of Hathras, Part 2 of 2

00:11:56

Selections of Mystic Verses of Tulsi Sahib (vegetarian), Saint of Hathras, Part 2 of 2

“Rare is the human form even for gods, thus declare all sages from the housetops. Declare all sages from the housetops: Even gods will not obtain the human form. For such a heaven do the foolish aspire, whence gods get thrown into hell when earned merit ends. Lured into the performance of pious deeds, people have still to wander from species to species. He who has perceived the Essence within his body and mind Looks down with contempt, O Tulsi, on the pleasures of paradise. Rare, indeed, is the human form even for the gods, thus declare all sages from the housetops.” “Listen to me Palak Ram, my esteemed friend. They verily fall into the dungeon of hell Who slaughter living beings and eat their flesh; Who kills a goat, suffers the consequences. They do this to seek the pleasure of the palate. And cause life from the living to be extinguished. For the sake of sensual gratification they buy sin. And get their abode in the fires of hell. Never will they get release from this bondage, Be they hermits, recluses, householders or others. None will escape the tortures of hell. Whoever has eaten flesh and fish in this life Is bound in captivity by the butcher, Kal (the negative power). Nothing good will come out of such conduct. Take this as evidence from the writings of Saints. Nanak and Kabir have given the same message, Dadu and Dariya have sung the same song.” “Look at the folly of man, for which he suffers much pain: He kills a living being, he deprives it of its right to live. He cuts a goat and offers it to appease the goddess. The ignorant fool knows not the wages of his sin. Others’ offspring he kills and feels no compassion. How shall he be well, suffering anguish life after life? He eats the flesh of beasts, he puts them to an untimely death; Such a man will take on the form of a ghost, life after life. Tulsi declares from the housetops: Kill not the living; Within all resides the beloved Lord — listen, O men and women!” “The mental make-up of man emanates from his karmas. He remains involved in performing actions good and bad. According to the nature of the actions he performs, He is put into the bondage of various species. In accordance with the trade that a merchant practices, He carries loss and profit, pain and pleasure along with him. He who conducts his trade under the sway of desires Drifts with the currents of the ocean of eighty-four; He moves from species to species according to his actions. This snare is manifestly spread in the entire creation. He is born, he dies, and again he takes a new frame; As he sows, so does he reap the fruit of his actions. In the cycle of eighty-four, he remains in slumber; And in the human form, only a rare one awakens. Through a Master’s teachings he realizes God, Just as collyrium (healing herb) placed in his eyes restores his vision. Without a Master’s teachings to guide them, even gods, men and sages do not get release; When Brahma, Vishnu and Mahesh get not deliverance, what can we say about ordinary creatures?” “Oh think thou deeply and deliberate; Without the guidance of a Master The way cannot ever be found. He will dye thee in satsang’s color. Take thy soul to regions celestial. And reveal the firmament within. If thou desirest to revel In realms spiritual within thine own self, None will help thee except the Saints. In a short moment wilt thou depart, And thy body be reduced to dust. Thy Master alone, O Tulsi, will show The entrance back to thy Home.” “Man continues to stumble in ignorance and thus goes on suffering from the shaft of pain. He is bereft of the company of the holy; who but the Saint can put him on the Path? If he were to meet the benevolent Satguru, the primordial mystery would be unraveled. Indeed, O Tulsi, the Master would wipe off the stores of karma and drive the Angel of Death away.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-24   221 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-24

Stoicism as a Way of Life - Selection from Epictetus’ Enchiridion, Part 2 of 2

00:14:07

Stoicism as a Way of Life - Selection from Epictetus’ Enchiridion, Part 2 of 2

Today, we continue with a selection from Epictetus’ teachings, as recorded by his student Arrian, in the book “The Enchiridion.” The Stoic sage gives more guidelines on how to live a life of freedom and one in harmony with nature. “If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and dull with regard to externals. Do not desire to be thought to know anything; and though you should appear to others to be somebody, distrust yourself. For be assured, it is not easy at once to keep your will in harmony with nature and to secure externals; but while you are absorbed in the one, you must of necessity neglect the other.” “A master is he who is able to confer or remove whatever that man seeks or shuns. Whoever then would be free, let him wish nothing, let him decline nothing, which depends on others; else he must necessarily be a slave.” “And if you do not so much as take the things which are set before you, but are able even to forego them, then you will not only be worthy to feast with the gods, but to rule with them also. For, by thus doing, Diogenes and Heraclitus, and others like them, deservedly became divine, and were so recognized.” “As far as conversation goes, however, do not disdain to accommodate yourself to him and, if need be, to groan with him. Take heed, however, not to groan inwardly, too. ‘Remember that you are an actor in a drama of such sort as the Author chooses — if short, then in a short one; if long, then in a long one. If it be His pleasure that you should enact a poor man, or a cripple, or a ruler, or a private citizen, see that you act it well. For this is your business — to act well the given part, but to choose it belongs to another.’” “Now, for your part, do not have a supercilious look indeed, but keep steadily to those things which appear best to you, as one appointed by God to this particular station. For remember that, if you are persistent, those very persons who at first ridiculed will afterwards admire you. But if you are conquered by them, you will incur a double ridicule.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-20   218 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-06-20

Perek Shira - Singing Praises to the Creator: From “In Front of the Blind” by the Reverend Rabbi Asa Keisar (vegan), Part 2 of 2

00:12:56

Perek Shira - Singing Praises to the Creator: From “In Front of the Blind” by the Reverend Rabbi Asa Keisar (vegan), Part 2 of 2

Today, we will continue our reading of the Reverend Rabbi Keisar’s book “In Front of the Blind,” an excerpt from chapter “The Purpose of Animals.” “The Whale says: ‘Give thanks to Hashem (God) for He is good, His kindness endures forever.’ The Fish say: ‘The voice of Hashem is upon the waters, The God of glory thunders; Hashem is upon a multitude of waters.’” “The Sheep and Goats say: ‘Who is like You among the mighty ones, Hashem, who is like You, adorned in holiness, awesome in praise, worker of wonders!’” “The Cattle say: ‘Rejoice unto God, our strength, applaud the God of Jacob!’ The Swine say: ‘Hashem is good to the upright and the straight of heart.’” “The Camel says: ‘Hashem roars from upon high and sounds His voice from His holy Abode, and roars His agony about His Temple.’” “The Horse says: ‘Behold, as the eyes of the servants to their master’s hand, as the eyes of a maid to her mistress’s hand, so are our eyes to Hashem our God until He will favor us.’” “The Donkey says: ‘To You, Hashem, is the greatness and the might and the triumph and the glory for everything in Heaven and Earth is Yours; To You, Hashem, is the monarchy and the sovereignty over every leader.’” “In the book of Kings 2 it tells how the army of Sennacherib surrounded Jerusalem in the days of King Hezekiah. 180,000 of Sennacherib’s soldiers died when they came to fight against the nation of Israel and that which caused their death was the song of animals. As it is said, Rabbi Yitzchak Nafcha says: ‘He revealed ears for them and they hear the songs from the mouths of the creatures and they died.’” “Radak: ‘This refers to Isaiah’s prophecy ‘And a wolf shall live with a lamb,’ and that is discussed there.’” “‘And a wolf shall live with a lamb, and a leopard shall lie with a kid; and a calf and a lion cub and a fatling [shall lie] together, and a small child shall lead them. And a cow and a bear shall graze together, their children shall lie; and a lion, like cattle, shall eat straw. And an infant shall play over the hole of an old snake and over the eyeball of an adder, a weaned child shall stretch forth his hand. They shall neither harm nor destroy on all My holy mount, for the land shall be full of knowledge of the Lord as water covers the seabed.’”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-11-07   216 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-11-07

Selections from Zoroastrianism’s Sacred Menog-i Khrad: Chapters 47- 63, Part 1 of 2

00:12:17

Selections from Zoroastrianism’s Sacred Menog-i Khrad: Chapters 47- 63, Part 1 of 2

Zoroaster was a prophet who lived in ancient Iran around 1800 BC. The teachings that emerged from His visions of God have become known as Zoroastrianism. Zoroastrian theology’s main tenets include the existence of one God and the personal happiness or reward that is the natural outcome of using one’s free will to formulate good thoughts, good words and good deeds. Respecting all life, Zoroaster was Himself a pure vegetarian and forbade all animal sacrifice. His universal philosophy is believed to have influenced Greek thought and major revealed religions of the world. Today, we invite you to listen to excerpts of chapters 47-63 from “Menog-i Khrad” (The Spirit of Wisdom), one of the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism. CHAPTER 47 “It is wisdom which is better than the wealth of every kind which is in the world. It is destiny that is predominant over everyone and everything. CHAPTER 49 “Because, as to the creatures and creations of every kind, that the creator Ohrmazd created for the worldly existence, which are procreative and also which are developable, for every single body there is its own single guardian spirit of a like nature. And the motion of the sun and moon is the special illumination of the world, and the maturing of procreations and growths of all kinds. And the correct keeping of the day, month, and year, summer and winter, spring and autumn, and other calculations and accounts of all kinds which men ought to obtain, perceive, and understand, are more fully defined by means of the setting of the sun and moon.” CHAPTER 52 “For the existence of renunciation of sin, the special thing is this, that one commits no sin voluntarily; and if, through folly, or weakness and ignorance, a sin occurs, he is then in renunciation of sin before the high-priests and the good. And after that, when he does not commit it, then that sin which is committed by him becomes swept from his body; just as the wind which is hasty and mighty, when it comes swift and strong, sweeps so over the plain that it carries away every single blade of grass and anything which is broken in that place.” CHAPTER 57 “The knowledge and sagacity of the worldly existence, the learning and teaching in every profession, and all advancement of temporal beings are through wisdom. The souls of the righteous, in escaping from hades and coming to heaven and the supreme heaven arrive much better by means of the power and protection of wisdom. And it is possible to seek the good living, good repute, and every happiness of people in the worldly existence, through the power of wisdom.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-10   215 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-08-10

The Wisdom of Solomon: Selection from the Books of the Apocrypha, Part 1 of 2

00:11:00

The Wisdom of Solomon: Selection from the Books of the Apocrypha, Part 1 of 2

The Apocrypha is a group of ancient books with uncertain authorship whose contents overlap parts of the Christian and Hebrew Bibles. The term “apocrypha” means “secret,” “hidden,” or “non-canonical.” Indeed, these books have been considered sacred, with a more advanced teaching than would normally be made available to the general public. Today, apocryphal books remain part of the Holy Bible in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches, while other Christian traditions still value them for religious study. One of the Apocrypha books is The Wisdom of Solomon, in which wisdom is personified – such is the emphasis placed on that virtue. Today, we will explore an enthralling selection from the Apocrypha book, “The Wisdom of Solomon,” in regards to the true virtues of life, being the real means of approaching it, as wisdom is elaborated on as treasured goal for us to achieve. Wisdom is referred to as “she,” and is being described as an ultimate richness of life. “Wisdom is glorious, and never fadeth away: yea, she is easily seen of them that love her, and found of such as seek her. She preventeth them that desire her, in making herself first known unto them. Whoso seeketh her early shall have no great travail: for he shall find her sitting at his doors. To think therefore upon her, is perfection of wisdom: and whoso watcheth for her shall quickly be without care.” “For she goeth about seeking such as are worthy of her, sheweth herself favourably unto them in the ways, and meeteth them in every thought. For the very true beginning of her is the desire of discipline; and the care of discipline is love; and love is the keeping of her laws; and the giving heed unto her laws is the assurance of incorruption; and incorruption maketh us near unto God: therefore, the desire of wisdom bringeth to a kingdom.” “I preferred her before sceptres and thrones, and esteemed riches nothing in comparison of her. Neither I compared unto her any precious stone, because all gold in respect of her is as a little sand, and silver shall be counted as clay before her.” “God hath granted me to speak as I would, and to conceive as is meet for the things that are given me: because it is He that leadeth unto wisdom, and directeth the wise.”
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-21   213 vizionări
Cuvinte ale înțelepciunii
2020-09-21
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