Căutaţi după dată
De la
Pentru
1 - 5 de 5 Rezultate
Selecţie
Categorie :
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
Subtitrări :

Holy Songs - Russian Orthodox Chants

00:16:48

Holy Songs - Russian Orthodox Chants

Since ancient times, humans have expressed their love and longing for God through singing and music. These holy songs connect us with the Divine and remind us of our heavenly Home. Russia is a multi-continental country stretching from Eastern Europe to Northern Asia and spanning eleven time zones, it is the largest country in the world by area. Russian Orthodoxy has been the main religion for a millennium after Russia adopted Byzantine Orthodox Christianity in 988. The spiritual and artistic Russian people have piously searched for their spiritual elevation, and there are countless Russian holy songs. Today we are privileged to share with you two Russian Orthodox chants performed by the amazing Chór Akademicki UW, or University of Warsaw Choir, one of the oldest academic choirs in Poland. Both chants are from “All-Night Vigil,” a cappella choral composition by the famous Russian composer of the Romantic period, Sergei Rachmaninoff. This extraordinary composition was hailed as “the greatest musical achievement of the Russian Orthodox Church.” The first chant, “Blessed Art Thou, O Lord” is one of the Byzantine Orthodox morning prayers in the ancient Russian language, praising the Lord Jesus Christ who had triumphed over death. This piece expressed such joy for the rising of the Lord Jesus Christ. How fortunate are we to have the Savior, the Son of God, to walk among us and teach us right from wrong. The next chant is called “Blessed is the Man.” The Lord knows the way of the righteous and blessed are those who heed His teachings. May we aspire to heed the messages of the Enlightened Masters and return to our pure, loving self-nature.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-03   531 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-03

Bartering - Exchanging Goods, Services and Friendship

00:15:40

Bartering - Exchanging Goods, Services and Friendship

Welcome to our program, “Bartering – Exchanging Goods, Services and Friendship.” Bartering was a system of trade introduced by the Mesopotamia tribes dating back to 6,000 BC. The Phoenicians adopted the system to trade goods with other cities across the oceans. An improved bartering system was developed by the Babylonians and was used to exchange goods for food, tea, spices, and other commodities. With the global adoption of a monetary system, simple bartering of goods and services between people is less practiced, but still exists in some parts of the world. In the Koraput region in India where over 48 indigenous communities live, bartering is still a common practice. Many villages in Malaysia still use bartering as their main means of trade. In recent years, bartering is making a comeback in Hawaii where people see each other as part of the ʻohana, or extended family. With this modern bartering system, people are able to trade services, talent and skills. In Africa, certain countries use bartering to help children get an education. In Nigeria, many schools allow parents to trade in used plastic bottles for their children’s school fees under the RecyclesPay Education Project, a campaign by the African Clean Up Initiatives. The barter system is practiced at an international level between large companies and countries using treaties and trade deals to exchange goods and services. It’s the perfect way for companies to clear obsolete or surplus inventory and achieve zero waste. There are many advantages of bartering. It’s economical and saves resources. Something you no longer use may just be the item someone else has been looking for. The exchange is also more direct, immediate, and personal. It’s an opportunity for interaction between people, a chance to form lasting friendships that are much more valuable. Supreme Master Ching Hai once hinted in a lecture in 1992 that one day, the Earth can even barter with beings from other planets…
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-09   358 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-09

The Spiritual Sámi of Northern Europe

00:16:00

The Spiritual Sámi of Northern Europe

Today, we present some highlights of the Sámi culture, an indigenous culture present in the northernmost Nordic countries and the Kola Peninsula within the Murmansk Oblast of Russia. Traditionally, the bond between the Sámi and the natural land has been profound and sacred. They have historically lived their lives in accordance with nature. Deeply grounded in the understanding that from the earth comes life, the Sámi hold the view that all beings are threads in the same great fabric. Over history, they looked to nature for guidance and keenly observed symbols in everyday life such as cloud formations, changes in wind patterns and weather, and movements of animals. They watched for and learned from the rhythms of nature. To this day, the Sámi truly respect and cherish Mother Earth. The yoik also played an important role in shamanism. As a historically nomadic people, the Sámi preferred connection to the land over land ownership. Their kinship with nature was pure in the sense that they did not view land as something that could be divided and owned. They didn't erect fences or boundaries. Instead, their lifestyles focused on living in harmony with the natural spaces, using nature’s resources as wisely as possible, and respecting the earth's cycles. This deep respect continues to this day, and committed people of the Sámi culture have spoken out to remind humanity of the necessity to preserve our environment. We wish that the Sámi people continue to propagate their language and their cultural contributions like the yoik for the world to enjoy and celebrate. May we also take to heart their philosophy of treading lightly on our only planetary home.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-10-21   261 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-10-21

Taiwan (Formosa)’s Bunun People – Fascinating Legends, Beautiful Ceremonies

00:15:59

Taiwan (Formosa)’s Bunun People – Fascinating Legends, Beautiful Ceremonies

Among the Austronesian peoples of the world, the Bunun aboriginal group of Taiwan (Formosa) lives at the northernmost and highest point on Earth. They are known as the patron saints of Yushan Mountain, the island's tallest mountain. They have an orally-based culture with no written language, and they are also the ethnic group with the most ceremonies among Taiwan (Formosa)'s aborigines. Today, we explore the Bunun’s legends and rituals. The Bunun’s grandest festival is the harvest celebration. The pasibubut (eight-part polyphony) sung at the festival is a world-renowned traditional musical art form. While expressing the group’s best wishes and gratefulness to Heaven, the key point is the singers’ harmony and the sincerity in their hearts, rather than the prayer’s lyrics. The statues at the gate of Tao-yuan Primary School in Taitung County’s Yanping Township are unique. They are of a red-billed black bulbul and toad. These humble animals are the superheroes of a Bunun legend. The Bunun believe that the red-billed black bulbul originally did not have a red beak, red feet, or a black body, and the toad did not exist. The bird's appearance changed, and the toad was created because of saving the Bunun people. All ceremonies are regarded as important events by the Bunun people. For any ceremony, there will be group singing and dancing, just as pasibutbut (eight-part polyphony) is sung to Heaven during the harvest festival. The Bunun plant a staple food called millet. When millet is harvested, they hold a Homeyaya (Millet Offering) and sing to express their gratitude to Heaven. This is a Homeyaya song that the Bunun elders performed for us. Next is a song by the children from the Bunun Tao-yuan Primary School Choir, and is sung especially for our viewers! The meaning of the song is to thank and pray to Heaven and the ancestral spirits for a healthy environment and giving the Bunun people peaceful days!
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-11-11   252 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-11-11

The Māori Tūhoe People- Guardians of the Sacred Te Urewera Rainforest

00:14:24

The Māori Tūhoe People- Guardians of the Sacred Te Urewera Rainforest

Today, we visit Oceania to learn about the Māori Tūhoe. New Zealand is a country located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. It comprises two main islands, namely, the North Island and South Island plus about 600 other smaller islands. The nation has a population of about 5 million, of which the majority are of European descent, with the Māori forming the most significant minority and then followed by Asians and Pacific Islanders. The Māori call New Zealand Aotearoa. This means the “land of the long white cloud” in the Māori language. They are the original inhabitants of New Zealand, having arrived in the 14th century from Eastern Polynesia. A distinct group of about 40,000 Māori is called the Tūhoe people who are the focus of today’s program. Te Urewera, the Tūhoe’s homeland, is located in New Zealand's North Island. It covers approximately 2,127 square kilometers of rugged hill country and features vast blue-green lakes and fast-running north-flowing rivers. The individuals living in these areas take care of the rainforest. Te Urewera is extremely important to the Tūhoe people, as historically it has been their primary source of food, clothing, medicine, shelter and dignity. The Tūhoe people protect Te Urewera as a precious site via an ancient Māori practice known as kaitiakitanga, which means “guardianship,” through caring and maintaining the ecological system and environment. The key point of the practice is to understand the connection and relationship of people and nature. Humans are linked to the wild and need to protect and care for the mauri, or life force of the forests, rivers and lakes. This involves daily checking of the condition of the woodlands and water bodies through the observation and collection of data, replenishing and planting of native plants and trees, and safeguarding all habitats thus balancing the ecology within the rainforest and its surroundings. To the Tūhoe, mountains are significant places as they are the final resting place of their ancestors. Mountains are reflected in Tūhoe oral traditions, songs and haka or dance as significant symbols of identity. The Tūhoe certainly respect nature. We now share some examples of Tūhoe traditions.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-15   238 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-15
<1>Go to page
Aplicaţia
Scanaţi codul QR sau alegeţi sistemul potrivit pentru încărcare pe telefon
iPhone
Android
Subtitrări