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Urme culturale în jurul lumii
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The Waorani People – Pioneers and Protectors of the Amazon

00:16:27

The Waorani People – Pioneers and Protectors of the Amazon

Ecuador hosts a portion of the magnificent Amazon rainforest and is also home to the native Waorani people, also known as the Huaorani, Waodani, or the Waos. Like other indigenous tribes across the globe, the Waorani have a symbiotic relationship with the natural environment. The forest is their beloved space, and they rely on nature for sustenance, water, safety, emotional fulfillment, and comfort. Hence, they passionately seek to protect and preserve the forest and its resources for younger generations. Indeed, the forest is full of natural treasures, such as a range of plants that are thought to keep the Waorani people healthy and strong. Phytochemicals are biochemicals that plants make to survive. The plants use these chemicals to defend themselves against dangerous microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and even certain parasites. Human cells have receptors that absorb these protective plant phytochemicals. The Waorani also rely on the forest in the construction of their homes. While Waorani society is reported to be quite egalitarian, with relative equality between men and women, many Waorani women, in particular, are boldly leading the people into the future and raising awareness of the necessity of forest protection.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-03-18   412 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-03-18

Traditonal Musical Instrument: Taiko - The Heartbeat of Japan

00:19:28

Traditonal Musical Instrument: Taiko - The Heartbeat of Japan

In Japanese “Taiko” means the “great drum.” For generations, the method of taiko playing has been taught and passed on by grand masters. In varying shapes and sizes, taiko drums have long been a part of Japanese cultural, religious, and musical traditions. The art of taiko drumming is known for its tightly choreographed movements similar to martial arts. The instrument’s fluid, powerful, and rhythmic playing style symbolizes the heartbeat of Japan. With the emergence of art forms such as Noh and Kabuki dance-drama, taiko drums eventually became an accompanying instrument in theatre and court music. The Buddhist and Shinto religions gave taiko drums a sanctifying role. Taiko drumming is also an integral part of Matsuri festivals in Japan, where communities celebrate the gods and honour their ancestors. There are now over 8,000 taiko groups in Japan, more than a dozen groups in Canada, and many more worldwide. Let's enjoy a synchronized drumming performance by Kokyo Taiko.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-02-26   618 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-02-26

Hula Dance, the Spirit of Hawaii, Part 1 of 2

00:19:50

Hula Dance, the Spirit of Hawaii, Part 1 of 2

The hula dance is an integral part of Hawaiian culture, and dates back 1,500 years ago, when the ancient Polynesians voyaged to Hawaii. In ancient Hawaii, there were different dances for various occasions. One of the rules in Hula dancing is “Kuhi no ka lima, hele no ka maka” or “Where the hands move, there let the eyes follow.” In other words, a dancer should always watch their hands at all times, rather than looking at the audience. In Hawaiian Hula dance, each movement, expression, and gesture is deliberate, with a specific meaning. “A hula dancer is a storyteller, you’re telling the story. So, if you’re talking about ‘This is my song.’ So of course you’re gonna be, your hands to your mouth and out, and because you want to give to your audience.” According to Hawaiian legend, the goddess of Hula is Laka, who is also the goddess of the forest, and watches over all vegetation. It’s believed that Goddess Laka provides inspiration for Hula dancers, and so many dancers today still pray to her for successful performances. With soothing music, and body movements connecting natural vibrations and energy, Hula is not only spiritual but also therapeutic.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-05-06   516 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-05-06

The iTaukei of Fiji: Islanders with Heart

00:13:16

The iTaukei of Fiji: Islanders with Heart

Today, we are going to travel to a quintessential tropical island paradise with balmy breezes to learn about an indigenous people whose ancestors came to this beautiful archipelago around 3,500 years ago. Fiji is truly spectacular and features white sand beaches, turquoise oceans, palm trees and fertile land. It’s no wonder the ocean-faring Melanesians, called the Lapita, who found their way to the islands decided to stay and make the archipelago their home. Today, most iTaukei continue to live in their villages with traditional governmental structures. One cultural experience that many tourists enjoy when in Fiji is visiting an indigenous community to observe their way of life. The ancient indigenous Fijians were an ocean-going people who, like many of the Melanesian and Polynesian cultures, built sea-worthy canoes whose capabilities show their civilization had achieved an impressive level of technological advancement. Architecture reveals to us the cultural values, traditions and beliefs of a society. The same can be said of the types of buildings found in Fijian villages, which reflect the influence of communal values that infuse life in Fiji. One of the most important structures is the valenivanua, which is the traditional meeting house or cultural space used by clan heads and the village chief. Meke is storytelling through song, dance and music. For generations, the indigenous Fijians have passed down their history, beliefs, traditions, morals and values through the meke. The Fijian people are as kind, warm and welcoming as their nation’s gentle breezes and tropical waters. May you have the unique opportunity to journey here one day to experience this paradise and the splendid native culture.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-08-19   455 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-08-19

Holy Songs: Uplifting Ethiopian Songs

00:18:22

Holy Songs: Uplifting Ethiopian Songs

Ethiopia is one of the world’s oldest countries. In today’s show, we are delighted to share with you three Ethiopian worship songs in Amharic. The First song is called, “Holy Spirit,” performed by Zuriyash Tsega W/Tensai and Samuel T Michael. The song expresses one’s deep longing for the radiant presence of the Holy Spirit. Our next song is “Igziabeher’s Peace” composed by Mesfin Gutu, and performed by Bereket, Ephrem, Sammy, and Teddy. “Igziabeher” means “Our Father Lord of Eternity” in Geez, a language used by the ancient Ethiopian Tewahado Church. Finally, our third song is called “It is Possible,” performed by Kalkidan Abebe and composed by Ayouab Gebremariam. This Amharic Gospel song uplifts our spirit and reminds us of all the things we can do when we remember God.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-02-12   719 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-02-12

The Resourceful Dorze People of Ethiopia

00:14:09

The Resourceful Dorze People of Ethiopia

The Dorze live in the Gamo Highlands of Southern Ethiopia and have a population of about 30,000. Living approximately 2,600 meters above sea level, this hospitable community is renowned for its creative members who are skillful cotton weavers and builders. The Dorze are famous for the architectural design and construction of their homes. The residences are 6 – 12 meters high and are made in the shape of an elephant’s head, often with two holes at the top that resemble the pachyderm’s eyes. Leaf sheaths of the enset, or the false banana plant, are used on the structures and can last a remarkable 10 – 20 years! The previously mentioned enset is a highly versatile plant that is much utilized by the Dorze. Although it doesn’t produce bananas, every part of it is still used in various practical ways. For example, the women prepare kocho, a type of flatbread, from the trunk and stem. Bula, a starchy white powder that can be utilized to make dumplings or porridge, also comes from the plant. The fibrous strands of the trunk are employed in the creation of houses, ropes, and a musical instrument known as the krar. The Dorze people show such remarkable resourcefulness and ingenuity by using this plant in such varied means! The Dorze love to sing and dance and have a deep appreciation for music. Their songs use polyphonic multi-part vocals where all members of the community are actively involved in the process of singing, clapping and celebrating. It is also a custom that the whole village sings before, during, and after funeral rites. The Dorze are also highly expressive in their weaving. In fact, their workmanship is admired so much that they have earned the reputation of being the finest cotton weavers in Ethiopia. In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital, the word Dorze is actually used as a synonym for weaving! Indeed, the Dorze people are skilled in many areas of life and are able to express themselves creatively through activities such as building and weaving as well as performing traditional songs and dances.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-06-12   373 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-06-12

The Ainu - Indigenous People of Japan

00:13:42

The Ainu - Indigenous People of Japan

The word Ainu means human in the Ainu language. Ainu mainly reside on Japan’s Hokkaido Island, with a very small number living in Russia. The traditional dress is comprised of a robe covered with geometric patterns. Genetic studies certainly reveal a fascinating picture of the Ainu people’s ancestry. It is thought that the Ainu are descendants of the Jōmon people whose culture flourished between 14,000 BC and 300 BC in what is now modern-day Japan. The Ainu have traditionally had a strong bond with the natural world. In the Ainu belief system, two worlds exist. One is the world of the kamuy or the world of the gods, and the other is the Ainu world. Souls are thought to reside within natural phenomena such as the trees, plants, and animals, and there is an emphasis on living in mutual respect with the kamuy. One place where a deep connection can be made with nature is Lake Akan, a serene crater lake in the Akan Mashu National Park in Eastern Hokkaido. It has been suggested that the traditional Ainu symbiosis with nature is symbolized at Lake Akan by the unique marimo algae balls that appear here. In the Ainu language, the balls are referred to as tokarip or torasampe. Traditional Ainu dance was designated as an important intangible folk-cultural property by the Japanese government in 1984, and was listed as an intangible cultural heritage of humanity by The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2009. The traditional style involves a large circle of dancers, sometimes with onlookers who sing an acapella accompaniment. Some dances imitate the calls and movements of animals or insects such as the Crane and Typhoon dance; other dances are in fact rituals. Believing that deities can be found in their surroundings, the Ainu frequently use dance to worship and give thanks to nature. Dancing was also done for entertainment and enjoyment. Another Ainu artform is the Yukar, or epic poetry. Epics, songs, and stories are how the Ainu passed on their knowledge to each new generation. Some of their oral literature, such as Yayerap, Sakorpe, Oyna, or Kamuy Yukar, have melodies. One of the musical instruments that the Ainu play is called the mukkuri. This mouth harp is usually made from bamboo or a single piece of wood. Another instrument is the tonkori, which experienced a revival in the last two decades. It is the only stringed instrument in the Ainu tradition. Oki Kano is widely regarded to be the most prominent tonkori player.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-07-15   540 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-07-15

Hula Dance, the Spirit of Hawaii, Part 2 of 2

00:16:27

Hula Dance, the Spirit of Hawaii, Part 2 of 2

As mentioned in the previous episode, Hawaiian mythologies, history, genealogies, and traditions were passed down from generation to generation through chant, or “oli,” and accompanying dance called “hula.” Today we are honored to have on our show Kumu Hula (master hula teacher) and choreographer, Ms. Nawahine Kuraoka. Ms. Kuraoka is here to share with us her knowledge of the beautiful hula dance. “We all got to love hula as much as we love our family, as hula is part of our life. And hula is not just hula. Hula is life for us. Everything is Hula.” “We talk about the ancient ways of hula Kahiko with ipu, ipu heke and the pahu drum. And we use these instruments to dance ancient hula.” “Everything is alive, living plants, living hula, that’s what we do. Living hula each and every day, from morning to sunset. We thank God each and every day with ‘pule’ or pray to give thanks for all that we have. That's why I tell a lot of people, ‘Don't take for granted where you live, that we are so lucky, so lucky!’”
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-05-13   842 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-05-13

The Open House Culture of Malaysia

00:18:24

The Open House Culture of Malaysia

Fully embracing their multi-culture identity, Malaysians have a unique custom called, “open house,” which means during important cultural and religious festivals, they would open their houses to welcome not only friends and families, but also strangers. Through feasting and chatting together, cultural barriers are broken and new friendships are formed. Though 60% of the population are Muslims, national holidays such as Christmas, Chinese New Year, Deepavali, and native harvesting festivals are also celebrated, alongside various Islamic holidays such as the holy month of Ramadan, Eid-ul Fitr, and Eid-ul Adha. Now let’s take a look at how Malaysians celebrate some of their other holidays. His Excellency, Tun Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad, actively promotes harmonious existence among citizens of different races and backgrounds. “Malaysia was built on the foundations of tolerance, goodwill, mutual respect, the readiness of giving and sharing, selflessness, and a desire to make sacrifices for the sake of the country.” “Without such traits, Malaysia would not have grown into a developed country, which is capable of giving its people all the comforts and progress it has today.”
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-01-17   503 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-01-17

Zaouli: Côte d’Ivoire’s Mesmerizing Mask Dance

00:14:52

Zaouli: Côte d’Ivoire’s Mesmerizing Mask Dance

Dance is an integral part of the African culture, and today we are delighted to share with you a very exceptional and unique dance form from West Africa. Zaouli is regarded as a homage to feminine beauty. The dance was created in the 1950s by the Gouro, an ethnic group in the midwestern part of Côte d’Ivoire, with each Gouro village having a prized Zaouli dancer. The dance and accompanying music were inscribed on the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2017. Let's now enjoy a spirited Zaouli performance. An interesting component of the distinctive dance is that it is always performed by a male! The costume consists of bright colors. The mask and cloth adorn the body from the head down to the shoulders and arms. They will perform at parties, social gatherings, and funerals. Zaouli is viewed as a peace-making component of West African culture. Ethnic Jewels Magazine describes the dance as “a celebration of calm following conflict.”
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-01-08   821 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-01-08

The Sublime Beauty of Traditional Thai Dance

00:16:41

The Sublime Beauty of Traditional Thai Dance

Located in Southeast Asia, the Kingdom of Thailand, formerly known as Siam, is a country steeped in rich cultural traditions. The name “Thailand” means “land of the free.” In this auspicious nation, one of the earliest signs of human existence was found. Through the centuries, the influence of neighboring countries such as India, China, and Cambodia have helped shape Thailand’s diverse and colorful culture. Our program today will focus on their beautiful and iconic traditional dance. Known for its elegance, bright glittering costumes, graceful movements, and melodious musical accompaniments, this cherished art form mesmerizes people around the world. For nearly a thousand years, the Thai people have developed numerous dance styles. Thai dance has two main categories, classical and folk. Today, the popular Thai classical dance styles include Khon, Lakhon, and Hun Lakhon Lek. Among the different folk dance styles, the Fawn and Menora dances are the most popular today. Khon is a valuable part of the heritage and wisdom of the Thai people. In 2018, the classical Khon Masked Dance Drama was added to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. Regardless of the style, the basic movements and steps of Thai traditional dances are generally elegant and slow-paced, expressing humble and peaceful feelings. Hand movements are important elements in both Thai classical and folk dance. In folk dance performances such as Fawn and Menora, female dancers wear long artificial fingernails to enhance the gracefulness of their hand movements. Costumes Costumes play an important role in Thai dance. In classical dance, the costumes are mainly gold, or other bright colors, with glittering decorations or embroidered flowers. Through royal patronage, the efforts of traditional artists, and greater exposure to foreign tourists, the vibrance of Thai traditional dance was restored for the world. More than just an art form, this traditional dance is a symbol of Thailand itself.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-06-24   882 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-06-24

Holy Songs: Devotional Hindu Songs

00:18:27

Holy Songs: Devotional Hindu Songs

Our program today will feature Hindu songs composed and performed by Mr. Ramanathan Brahmanandam, a respected Hindu scholar and musician. He is also a compassionate vegetarian, who practices ahimsa (nonviolence) to aid his own Self-realization. Apart from being a distinguished scholar of Hinduism, Mr. Brahmanandam is also well-versed in the classical music tradition of South India. He composes and sings his own compositions in Tamil, which are steeped in philosophical content. The first song is called “kaņņirundum,” which stresses the importance of learning the scared text Ātma-bodha, or knowledge of the Self. The song initiates with a sloka, which serves as a prayer to the Divine Self, the true essence of our being. The next song is called “Thaye-en-Thuyar,”which expresses one’s longing to see the Mother Goddess Pārvatī in Hinduism and to be saved from the cycle of transmigration. “You are the illusion manifesting as reality! The Empress of the universe! Goddess of good qualities! Will You not cast Your glance at me?”
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-05-27   548 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-05-27

The Proud Kalinago of Dominica

00:16:55

The Proud Kalinago of Dominica

The Kalinago, previously known as the Caribs, are a proudly independent group of people who emigrated from South America to the Caribbean islands around the 13th century. Their skills as boat builders and sailors helped them expand their territory so that by the time the Spanish arrived two centuries later, they were the dominant culture on the islands. Today, most of the remaining 3,500 or so Kalinago live in Kalinago Territory, an autonomous region on the rugged eastern coast of Dominica. Fortunately, certain elements remained very strong, including basket weaving, cassava processing and canoe-building. Canoes have been a bedrock of the Kalinago culture since their ancestors left the Orinoco River Delta in South America 800 years ago. Through the concept of a living museum, the Kalinago Cultural Village by the Sea has created direct and indirect economic opportunities for the people, including employment for the Kalinago youth that enables them to showcase their traditions.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-02-19   1266 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-02-19

El Salvador’s Indigenous Peoples – Jewels of the Nation

00:14:32

El Salvador’s Indigenous Peoples – Jewels of the Nation

EI Salvador is in Central America and has the Pacific Ocean to the west, Guatemala to the north, and Honduras to the east. The Pipil people, who are the predominant indigenous group in the country, refer to their territory in Western EI Salvador as Cuscatlán, meaning “The Place of Jewel Necklaces.” Anyone who has ever had the opportunity to visit this exquisite nation will agree that it is a land of many jewels. There are about 37,000 Lenca in EI Salvador, concentrated in the eastern park of the nation. One of the fascinating aspects of the Lenca culture that has persevered to this day is the Guancasco, which is a pre-Colombian peace process. Economically, the Lenca are focused on agriculture. Specifically, they continue to use the milpa, which is a system of farming they embraced from the Mayan civilization. One aspect of Lencan culture that has been retained is that of pottery. Today, art galleries in the United States and Europe display the beautiful, bold geometric patterns crafted by Lencan potters.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-04-15   496 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-04-15

Holy Songs - Russian Orthodox Chants

00:16:48

Holy Songs - Russian Orthodox Chants

Since ancient times, humans have expressed their love and longing for God through singing and music. These holy songs connect us with the Divine and remind us of our heavenly Home. Russia is a multi-continental country stretching from Eastern Europe to Northern Asia and spanning eleven time zones, it is the largest country in the world by area. Russian Orthodoxy has been the main religion for a millennium after Russia adopted Byzantine Orthodox Christianity in 988. The spiritual and artistic Russian people have piously searched for their spiritual elevation, and there are countless Russian holy songs. Today we are privileged to share with you two Russian Orthodox chants performed by the amazing Chór Akademicki UW, or University of Warsaw Choir, one of the oldest academic choirs in Poland. Both chants are from “All-Night Vigil,” a cappella choral composition by the famous Russian composer of the Romantic period, Sergei Rachmaninoff. This extraordinary composition was hailed as “the greatest musical achievement of the Russian Orthodox Church.” The first chant, “Blessed Art Thou, O Lord” is one of the Byzantine Orthodox morning prayers in the ancient Russian language, praising the Lord Jesus Christ who had triumphed over death. This piece expressed such joy for the rising of the Lord Jesus Christ. How fortunate are we to have the Savior, the Son of God, to walk among us and teach us right from wrong. The next chant is called “Blessed is the Man.” The Lord knows the way of the righteous and blessed are those who heed His teachings. May we aspire to heed the messages of the Enlightened Masters and return to our pure, loving self-nature.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-03   567 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-09-03

Moon Lute – A Traditional Aulacese (Vietnamese) Musical Instrument - Part 2 of 2

00:16:36

Moon Lute – A Traditional Aulacese (Vietnamese) Musical Instrument - Part 2 of 2

“The advantage of the Moon Lute is in its performance techniques including loud, soft, long, short notes, and fluttering and snapping sounds with significant depth. When playing the Moon Lute, we have to be dedicated, and make an effort to find its unique features. Otherwise, if we just play it casually, then we can’t make use of all the features of the instrument.” “When the Moon Lute is played, it sounds exceptionally beautiful. The artisan who plays the Moon Lute has to express a very strong style. Thus, the lead instrument of a folk musical orchestra must be a Moon Lute.” Mr. Trương Hùng Việt kindly shared with us some of his experiences in making a Moon Lute that meets optimum standard. “In order to produce a Moon Lute, a very special kind of wood is required for the lute to have good sound. Also, that way, the Moon Lute could last up to 100 years. Especially since it is a string instrument, the older it gets, the more wonderful its sound will be. But its special feature is in its neck, which must be made using the old bamboo culm. It does not matter how well a Moon Lute is made, if the bamboo is not old, then the sound can never be lively, but very dull.” Besides its uniqueness as well as its diverse performing techniques, the value of the Moon Lute is based on its ability to improvise many tones skillfullly, from soft, gentle to strong, majestic sounds. Until today, through many trials, The Moon Lute is still very dear to the Aulacese, faithfully conveying people’s feelings through its sounds. The Moon Lute has truly gained a special place in the hearts of art lovers. To conclude our program, we invite you to enjoy the song “To Be Able to Love You,” composed by Supreme Master Ching Hai, with the Moon Lute performance by a traditional folk music group, and illustrated dance by our Association members.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-07-29   370 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-07-29

The Heiltsuk of British Columbia: Take a little, Leave a Lot

00:14:11

The Heiltsuk of British Columbia: Take a little, Leave a Lot

During our time together, we will learn about a resourceful group of individuals in Western Canada called the Heiltsuk. Most of the Heiltsuk today live in the village of Bella Bella. The Heiltsuk have a well-defined code of ethics and morality, which has historically been taught through their oral tradition, music, dance, and artwork. The word Heiltsuk literally means “to speak or act correctly,” which encompasses how people are to behave in everyday and ceremonial life. They have a well-defined system of traditional laws that have been upheld by their Hereditary Chiefs for thousands of years. They view these rules of their ancestors as the overriding principles for all resource use and environmental management. A core belief is that they should “take a little and leave a lot.” Fundamental to these ideas is the concept that all things are connected and unity is important to maintain. The Heiltsuk have historically been known as artisans who excelled in creating canoes, bentwood boxes, chests, ladles, and other objects. While there are certain aspects of Heiltsuk art that are shared with other groups in the Pacific Northwest, including crest imagery and totemic designs, each tribe has its own unique features and styles. As a maritime people, they used the canoe as their main form of transportation, trading, and communication with other groups for thousands of years. There were many varied styles that were made for different purposes, including ocean-going and river canoes, as well as ones for trading goods and freighting, ceremonies, transportation, and racing. The House of the Heiltsuk is a sacred place that is used for both governance and ceremony. It is where their ancestors visit them from the spirit world and where they can go back and forth between the worlds during ceremony. Step-by-step, the Heiltsuk have been working to strengthen and rejuvenate their cultural heritage, by finding ways to honor their customs and values while living and working in the modern age. As we have discovered today, they have great beauty to share with the world through their artistry and craftmanship, and a moral code of governance.
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-07-21   448 vizionări
Urme culturale în jurul lumii
2020-07-21
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